Hump

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Related to gibbus: Gibbous Moon, gibus hat

Hump

Informal; a period of rising security prices followed by a period of declining security prices. The period may be long term, short term or any period between the two. On a chart, this looks somewhat like a camel's hump. See also: Inverted Saucer.
References in periodicals archive ?
Identification of parasitic nematode larvae, Sulcascaris sulcata, in the calico scallop, Argopecten gibbus (Linnaeus), and the surf clam, Spisula soldidissima.
Orophiini (a) Xylographus corpulentus Mellie (a) Xylographus gibbus Mellie Xylographellini Scolytocis fritzplaumanni fritzplaumanni Lopes-Andrade TABLE 3.
Thus, when the anterior and middle columns in vertebrae and discs are destroyed by TB, physiological loading results in a progressive kyphus deformity producing the characteristic external gibbus deformity (13) and paraplegia of late onset due to the internal gibbus (14, 15).
Lutjanus gibbus was the only species that did not reach an asymptote in the unconstrained growth curve.
100 (9) 100 (5) Pacu Myleinae 78 (18) 100 (7) Peixe-Cachorro Cynodon gibbus 80 (5) 100 (5) Piranha Serrasalmus spp.
A characteristic gibbus, kyphotic deformity was present at the L1-2 level.
Distinctive MR features of pyogenic spondylitis include moderate paraspinal abnormal soft tissue, ill-defined paraspinal signal, and anterior-posterior vertebral involvement without gibbus deformity.
Radiographic manifestations of tuberculous spondylitis include destroyed vertebrae with associated intraosseous and paraspinal abscess formation, subligamentous spread of infection, extension into the spinal epidural space, vertebral body collapse, and focal gibbus formation.
Like many bivalves, Atlantic calico scallops (Argopecten gibbus, Linnaeus, 1758) begin life as males, though some switch to female as they age.
Her spine was short with a hemangioma in the lumbar region and a gibbus at the thoracolumbar junction.
gibbus (n = 16), Serrasalmus humeralis (n = 10), Ageneiosus brevifilis (n = 8), and Potamotrygon hystrix (n = 6).
This pattern also has not been examined statistically, although reports from different species conflict, with Dakin (1910) discounting any relationship between animal size and the number of eyes whereas Butcher (1930) claimed larger Pecten gibbus borealis (the bay scallop, now known as Argopecten irradians) had more eyes than smaller ones.