Ghosting

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Ghosting

The illegal practice that one firm drives a stock's price higher or lower, while other conspiring firms follow its lead to influence up the price of the stock.

Ghosting

An illegal practice in which two or more market makers collude in order to artificially inflate or deflate the price of a stock, hoping to profit on the uptick or downturn. One firm will buy or sell large amounts of a certain stock and the second firm does the same, causing a buy or sell frenzy. The supposed competitors then have the opportunity to profit as the market is unaware of their collusion. See also: Insider trading, antitrust.

ghosting

Illegal collusion among market makers to manipulate the market price of a stock.
References in classic literature ?
No one has had it for over a month, except the ghost, and orders have been given at the box-office that it must never be sold.
If the ghost came to the box, he must be seen, because he wore a dress-coat and a death's head.
Events may yet prove that idea to be a delusion, Miss Halcombe; but the belief is strong in me, at this moment, that the fancied ghost in the churchyard, and the writer of the anonymous letter, are one and the same person.
Connecting what I had discovered, thus far, with what I had suspected after hearing the story of the ghost seen at twilight, I wanted nothing more to confirm my resolution to watch Mrs.
And as I choked and strangled, and as the Ghost wallowed for an instant, broadside on and rolling straight over and far into the wind, I beheld a huge sea rise far above my head.
The Ghost was being wrenched and torn to fragments.
On this the ghost of Teiresias went back to the house of Hades, for his prophecyings had now been spoken, but I sat still where I was until my mother came up and tasted the blood.
Mother,' said I, 'I was forced to come here to consult the ghost of the Theban prophet Teiresias.
Pondering on what the Ghost had said, he did so now, but without lifting up his eyes, or getting off his knees.
The Ghost, on hearing this, set up another cry, and clanked its chain so hideously in the dead silence of the night, that the Ward would have been justified in indicting it for a nuisance.
You don't care for Ghosts, then," I ventured to suggest, unless they are really terrifying?
The regular Railway-Ghosts--I mean the Ghosts of ordinary Railway-literature--are very poor affairs.