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Risk

Often defined as the standard deviation of the return on total investment. Degree of uncertainty of return on an asset. In context of asset pricing theory. See: Systematic risk.

Risk

The uncertainty associated with any investment. That is, risk is the possibility that the actual return on an investment will be different from its expected return. A vitally important concept in finance is the idea that an investment that carries a higher risk has the potential of a higher return. For example, a zero-risk investment, such as a U.S. Treasury security, has a low rate of return, while a stock in a start-up has the potential to make an investor very wealthy, but also the potential to lose one's entire investment. Certain types of risk are easier to quantify than others. To the extent that risk is quantifiable, it is generally calculated as the standard deviation on an investment's average return.

risk

The variability of returns from an investment. The greater the variability (in dividend fluctuation or security price, for example), the greater the risk. Because investors are generally averse to risk, investments with greater inherent risk must promise higher expected yields.

Risk.

Risk is the possibility you'll lose money if an investment you make provides a disappointing return. All investments carry a certain level of risk, since investment return is not guaranteed.

According to modern investment theory, the greater the risk you take in making an investment, the greater your return has the potential to be if the investment succeeds.

For example, investing in a startup company carries substantial risk, since there is no guarantee that it will be profitable. But if it is, you're in a position to realize a greater gain than if you had invested a similar amount in an already established company.

As a rule of thumb, if you are unwilling to take at least some investment risk, you are likely to limit your investment return.

risk

see UNCERTAINTY AND RISK.

risk

Uncertainty regarding the possibility of loss.

References in periodicals archive ?
Many think of genetic testing as a relatively new frontier in medicine, but these survey results show that Americans are now aware of its potential and see it as a useful tool for understanding their genetic risk of disease," said Ora Gordon, MD, MS, Director of the Hereditary Cancer Prevention Program at the Disney Family Cancer Center of Providence St.
ly/1NhswWF) which shows that women with a high genetic risk of AMD and vitamin D deficiency are 6.
Her lab was the first to discover that ovarian hormones have an effect on genetic risk for psychiatric disorders in women.
Researchers examined data from 48,421 individuals who experienced 3,477 cardiac events during the study period, and evaluated the association of a genetic risk score, based on 27 known genetic variants, with a first time or repeat cardiac event.
The study by researchers from National Institutes of Health (NIH) shows power of combining big data analysis with cutting-edge genomic techniques and have identified potential genetic risk variants, which increase the chances that a person may develop Parkinson's disease.
Researchers assessed participants with a multilocus genetic risk score (GRS), originating from three meta-analyses of genome-wide association studies (GWAS) that used the number of cigarettes smoked daily as their phenotype.
According to the researchers, prenatal environmental experiences may influence future behavioral problems in children, especially in combination with the presence of genetic risk factors.
Study Details Publication Number: PD38-07 Genetic Correction of PSA Can Reduce the Number of Men Diagnosed With Potentially Insignificant Prostate Cancer: Results From a Surgical and Active Surveillance Cohort: Understanding a man's genetic risk for prostate cancer could potentially reduce the number of biopsies and diagnoses of low-grade, low-risk prostate cancer, according to a new study by researchers at Northwestern University Medical Center in Chicago, IL.
Using new statistical tools, Carnegie Mellon University's Kathryn Roeder has led an international team of researchers to discover that most of the genetic risk for autism comes from versions of genes that are common in the population rather than from rare variants or spontaneous glitches.
The key is learning the true genetic risk for an individual.
Of course, the concept of familial thrombophilia as a multigenetic disease has important implications for the laboratory analysis of patients who come from thrombophilia families and underlines the need for identification of those genetic risk factors that thus far remain unnoticed.

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