Marker

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Marker

A slang term for documentation indicating that a debt is owed.
References in periodicals archive ?
To confirm that the KRAS-variant was a genetic marker of ovarian cancer risk, Weidhaas and co-senior author Frank Slack studied women with ovarian cancer who also had evidence of a hereditary breast and ovarian cancer syndrome.
Registration of three genetic marker stocks for red clover: TP-RC, TP-LS, and TP-MC.
The second advance was the development of abundant genetic markers rapidly typable by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) (termed microsatellites), which amplified polymorphisms in simple sequence length repeats such as [CA]n (Figure) (18).
Tracking a rare genetic marker from a conventional alfalfa crop, Paul St.
Gerson will present describe the replication of a genetic marker for risk for CIA in a second, independent cohort of patients.
OTCBB:CYCR) today announced plans to begin trials for a quick, accurate, inexpensive screening test for endometrial and uterine cancers using a specialized computer-guided image recognition microscope system and the new P2X7 genetic marker to identify pre-cancerous cell changes.
The Company has previously announced it is developing a commercial genetic test for CIA risk using its newly validated research and noted that its research team continues to work on identifying and validating other genetic markers in this and other areas.
They also showed that individual white blood cells from the animals had the genetic marker belonging to the neural stem cells.
Members of those 12 families who had either form of cancer displayed the genetic marker much more often than does the general population.
From their analysis of YAP and another genetic marker, Skorecki, Hammer, and their colleagues concluded that the Y chromosomes of cohanim are indeed distinct from those of others Jews, which supports the oral tradition of father-to-son transmission of priestly status.
In order for genetic marker studies to translate into diagnostic tests with significant medical impact, discovery study results must be reproducible and applicable to a wide group of people," said Tom White, Ph.