Biotechnology

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Biotechnology

The use of living things, such as one-cell organisms, in technological innovations. Biotechnology has particular applications in medicine, agriculture, engineering, and similar fields. Biotech organizations may make and market their own products, or they may be departments within another company, such as a pharmaceutical corporation.
References in periodicals archive ?
The subject of genetic engineering often sparks an emotional reaction in many people.
However, the species-specific differences in rubber biochemistry described have considerable relevance to genetic engineering programs.
In order to ameliorate popular misgivings about the safety of BT/GE, science students and teachers (who are often not much wiser) are hoodwinked by the biotechnology industry into believing "that genetic engineering is not essentially different from traditional, time-tested interventions such as the breeding of plants and animals, or using yeasts to make bread or beer" (p.
Science needs people with West's intellectual and entrepreneurial zeal but, after reading Hall's account of the potential and pitfalls of genetic engineering, it isn't hard to come away with the impression that federal involvement in stem cell research would be for the better.
McKibben's fears that genetic engineering will reduce human freedom are misplaced.
And genetic engineering has given companies like Monsanto patents on seeds.
The primary criterion [for] judging the uses of genetic engineering and related biotechnologies [would be] the impact of those technologies on the balance of power and the life prospects of those who are poor, oppressed, or deprived of power in our society" (119).
And the truth about some genetic engineering, as Jane sees it is this: "It's a wholly untested--for-humans and for the environment--new technology that has been thrust upon us and, like rBGH, we really don't know what the consequences are--to our food, to our environment, to ourselves.
Do we know enough about genetic engineering to experiment with the world's food supply?
Used properly and with adequate government oversight, genetic engineering should be a boon to farmers, the environment, and, especially in developing nations, consumers.
Genetic engineering, billed as a boon to farmers, is apparently being renounced by growing numbers of them.
An anonymous group of environmental activists chopped down or girdled nearly a thousand cottonwoods and aspens at Oregon State University this spring, hoping to stop experimental genetic engineering on the trees.