code

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code

(1) Any systematic collection of laws, regulations, or rules.(2) Shorthand for any of the various building codes,such as, for example,“This historic property has been updated and meets all current code requirements.”

References in periodicals archive ?
It's the beginning of a parallel genetic code," New Scientist quoted Chin as saying.
One of the first things that people notice about the genetic code is its redundancy, Judson says.
Scientists have created an artificial life form using a genetic code written on a computer.
He considers the formal inheritance of language and genes, how complex syntax can become, how the form of genetic code maps the form of linguistic code, linguistic texts and genomic strings, and other aspects.
The Arbely group proposed to develop and apply such synthetic biology-based tools to modify the genetic code of cultured mammalian cells and bacteria with the aim to study the role of lysine acetylation in the regulation of metabolism and in cancer development.
Changing just one of its chemical components - a single genetic code element - is enough to generate blonde hair.
In this project, using metagenomics and single-cell genomics to explore uncultured microbes, we really had the opportunity to see how the genetic code operates in the wild.
Since the genetic code was deciphered in the 1960s, scientists have assumed that it was used exclusively to write information about proteins.
The team, which is led by Yi Liu, a researcher in the Department of Physiology at the University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, was perplexed when it found a paradoxical result years ago: that optimizing the use of codons (a sequence of three nucleotides that form a unit of genetic code in a DNA or RNA molecule) specifying an essential biological clock component actually abolished the organism's circadian rhythms.
Gorillas are the last of the living great apes to have their genetic codes mapped, allowing scientists to compare the genomes of humans, chimpanzees, gorillas and orang-utans.
The study looked at the heart disease risk conferred by several single-letter changes in the genetic code, or single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), on 9p21.
The marker is a "microsatellite" ( a portion of the genetic code containing a number of segments that repeat themselves.