run

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Run

A run consists of a series of bid and offer quotes for different securities or maturities. Dealers give and ask for runs from each other.

Run

An event in which many account holders at a bank withdraw all of their funds at the same time because they do not believe the bank is solvent. In the United States, runs were fairly common before the creation of the FDIC, which insures bank deposits up to a certain amount. See also: Panic.

run

1. A dealer's list of security offerings with respective bid and ask quotes. Compare off-the-run issue.
2. A sequence of security price movements in the same direction. Five straight days in which a stock price closes higher is an example of a run. Runs have been evaluated in order to determine if the charting of stock is a worthwhile way to earn an above-average return.

run

to start executing a specific PROGRAM on a COMPUTER.
References in classic literature ?
The vile gas, the foul air, the late hours -- what can you expect?
There also came to my nostrils a faintly pungent odor, and I could only assume that I had been overcome by some poisonous gas, but why I should retain my mental faculties and yet be unable to move I could not fathom.
All slept; the gas in the hall had been left faintly burning to light his return; a dreadful stillness reigned, broken by the deep ticking of the eight-day clock.
I had expected a rush of gas from the week-old corpse.
When the apparatus is at work this gas becomes luminous, giving out a white and continuous light.
As Mars approached opposition, Lavelle of Java set the wires of the astronomical exchange palpitating with the amazing intelli- gence of a huge outbreak of incandescent gas upon the planet.
We know that Fleury's gas can lift anything, as the world-famous trials of '89 showed, but its almost indefinite powers of expansion necessitate vast tank room.
It contained about three hundred and twenty cubic feet of gas, which, if pure hydrogen, would support twenty-one pounds upon its first inflation, before the gas has time to deteriorate or escape.
A balloon," said Oz, "is made of silk, which is coated with glue to keep the gas in it.
The day is closing in and the gas is lighted, but is not yet fully effective, for it is not quite dark.
The production of this gas is easy, and it has given the greatest satisfaction hitherto in aerostatic experiments.
There is not a greater difference in quality between a brick-bat and a gas than there is between oxygen and ether.