Gaffer

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Gaffer

In film, the person in charge of lighting effects. Because different lights draw out different emotions, a gaffer may be used in marketing to find the lighting (for example, for a commercial) most likely to elicit a positive response from a targeted consumer.
References in periodicals archive ?
But, the difference between the two Ys is an important one for Gaffe Owens.
Talking of Sir Bobby, we could have filled a page with the football manager's comical gaffes.
He suffers from low support ratings, partly triggered by the gaffes.
Compiled by San Francisco's Fineman PR, gaffes include tasteless celebrity comments, "Cocaine" energy drink and an activist organization showing its true colors.
I kept listening for something different, a gaffe, anything, but afterward I decided not to file because I had heard it all before.
Last night critics called the gaffe insensitive to the feelings of relatives of the fallen, and inconvenient to shopkeepers hit by a drop in trade from stayaway customers.
The biggest gaffe in this election was made by David Cameron who was way out in front to win the election and foolishly gave the Liberal leader, Mr Clegg, a platform to address millions of people.
The story of my gaffe with Queen Elizabeth is absurd.
While we are on about gaffes, The Journal still doesn't know the difference between a gaffe and a gaff ("Planners' gaff", The Journal, December 11).
Well, the writers make up for that gaffe by having Marcus's exotic blond colleague Chase (Jessica Gower) stroke Krista's face lasciviously and almost plant a kiss upon her trembling lips.
We've come to expect the occastional grammatical gaffe from the President of the United States, but he shared a recent slip-up with no less than NEPA's Hotline newsletter.
But amongst all my colleagues' amused badinage, not one accused me of perpetrating a 'gaffe Candidates, though, according to the media, gaffe daily - Charles Kennedy getting his party's tax figures confused; Charles Clarke, whose mobile phone went off at Labour's manifesto launch; Ed Matts, the Conservative who doctored his election address photos.