deficiency

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Deficiency

The amount by which a project's cash flow is not adequate to meet debt service.

Deficiency

1. The amount by which cash flow falls short of debt service. For example, if a company has $300,000 in current liabilities and only $250,000 in cash flow for a given year, its deficiency is $50,000.

2. In taxation, the amount by which one's tax liability exceeds what the individual person or organization reported. For example, if the IRS disallows certain deductions that the taxpayer applied, he/she will owe more in taxes than he/she reported on the return. Deficiency is the amount this taxpayer still owes to the IRS.

deficiency

1. The amount by which an individual's or an organization's tax liability as computed by the Internal Revenue Service exceeds the tax liability reported by the taxpayer.
2. The amount by which a firm's liabilities exceed assets.

deficiency

The amount due on a mortgage loan after adding all expenses of foreclosure and accrued interest to the principal balance of the loan and then deducting the sale price or lender-bid price for the property. The balance remaining, if any, may be collected by the lender by means of taking a deficiency judgment, unless prohibited by law or contract. Deficiency judgments may be collected just like any other judgment, through seizure of other assets or garnishment. There are two circumstances when a lender may not collect any deficiency:

1. In states with consumer protection statutes that outlaw deficiencies on first mortgages on a borrower's principal residence.

2. With mortgage loans designated as nonrecourse, meaning the lender and borrower agreed in advance that the property would stand for the debt and there would be no deficiency allowed in the event of foreclosure.

References in periodicals archive ?
These reticulocyte changes will prevent the identification of functional iron deficiency based on reduced CHr.
ROC curve analysis in individuals with functional iron deficiency shows that the biochemical markers display better sensitivity and specificity in the absence of an acute-phase reaction (C-reactive protein [less than or equal to]5 mg/L).
In cases of functional iron deficiency, which has grown in significance since the advent of EPO therapy, the body cannot mobilize iron rapidly enough from its primary storage sites in the RE tissues to meet the rapid acceleration in erythropoiesis generated by EPO therapy.
The team also suggested that the increase in patients achieving target Hgb levels could be attributed to the more aggressive treatment of inflammatory processes (which can lead to blockage of iron stores and EPO hyporesponse), more frequent treatment of functional iron deficiency, and a better overall focus on anemia management.
Neutrophil impairment associated with iron therapy in hemodialysis patients with functional iron deficiency.
With early recognition and intervention, even infrequent non-dextran IV iron treatments at modest "high" doses may suffice in preventing absolute and functional iron deficiency.
Functional iron deficiency may occur in 40% to 60% of rHuEPO-treated dialysis patients.
Functional iron deficiency is defined as TSAT levels less than 20% and serum ferritin levels greater than 100 ng/ml (NKF, 2001).
According to the National Kidney Foundation (2000), absolute iron deficiency is defined as TSAT levels less than 20% and serum ferritin levels less than 100 ng/ml, while functional iron deficiency is defined as TSAT levels less than 20% and serum ferritin levels within the normal range or slightly elevated (see Table 1).
Hemodialysis patients who are not responding to rEPO treatment and who have been diagnosed with absolute or functional iron deficiency should receive iron supplementation.
Functional iron deficiency (ferritin [greater than or equal to] 100 ng/ml and TSAT <20%) occurs when EPO-induced erythropoiesis consumes circulating iron faster than body stores can release it (NKF-K/DOQI 2001).
However, they recognized that some patients with TSATs greater than or equal to 20% may still have functional iron deficiency (that is, lack sufficient iron to keep up with the increased red blood cell [RBC] production associated with EPO use).

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