foreign crowd

Foreign crowd

NYSE members who trade in foreign bonds on the floor.

Foreign Crowd

Members of the New York Stock Exchange who deal primarily or exclusively in foreign bonds. See also: Crowd.

foreign crowd

Members of the New York Stock Exchange who trade foreign bonds on the exchange floor.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Foreigners made up around 25 percent of the population at the time, and while affluent Egyptians can be seen amongst the foreign crowd, the working class Egyptian or Bedouin is not afforded any space in the book.
1 Tokyo Hamburger' offered a taste of home for the almost 100% foreign crowd, although without access to buns, the meat was cut square so as to fit the sliced bread.
Two always becomes a foreign crowd, a mass, opposed to the individual American, and everything of which there is more than one or that occurs more than once is foreign: in the book's resonant final line, its last depiction of Beirut, we witness "the dead city photographed one more time" (240).
We might even relax a little in front of a foreign crowd as we're under pressure at home because our fans expect plenty of goals.
Schaeffer said the global test will be whether George Foreman can play to a foreign crowd.
The pic's centerpiece dance sequence, with which our hardy Yank heroes dazzle a hostile foreign crowd straight out of "Rocky IV" is a magnificent piece of choreography, juggling Olympic-level aerial gymnastics with a savvy theme tracing the evolution of American dance music from swing to hip-hop.
Investments into the infrastructure of the resort, resulting in the opening of the Snoras Snow Arena, which was the resort's biggest project in2011, are paying off, bringing large winter sports-hungry foreign crowds.
Moving into countries with long baseball histories (such as Japan and Australia) and into others that had never seen the game (such as Italy), their tour also captured the imagination of baseball fans in the United States who heard of hometown heroes performing impressive feats before distant, foreign crowds.
While Wordsworth's experience with foreign crowds is pleasant enough, native crowds become for him sites of illegibility and alienation.

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