foreign corporation


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Foreign corporation

A corporation conducting business in another country from the one it is chartered in and that abides by the laws of another country. See: Alien corporation.

Foreign Corporation

A corporation that operates in one country but was organized and is based in a different country. Foreign corporations must abide by domestic regulations and business practices, but may (or may not, depending on the specific organization) submit their profits to shareholders in the home country. Many corporations operate in multiple countries, and are considered foreign corporations in each country except the home country. See also: Domestic corporation, International corporation.

foreign corporation

A firm that conducts business in states or countries other than the state or country in which it is incorporated. For example, a firm incorporated in Canada but conducting business throughout North America is considered a foreign corporation in the United States. Compare domestic corporation.

foreign corporation

Any corporation organized under the laws of another state or country. Foreign corporations may sue and be sued in the courts of a state only if they are registered and licensed in that state.Normally,if a foreign corporation does business in a state without registration, it may not use the courts of the state to sue the defaulting party.

Foreign Corporation

A corporation not organized under the laws of one of the states or territories of the United States.
References in periodicals archive ?
Then the IPU discusses item la: When the name and address of the foreign corporation is omitted, other information on the form cannot be associated with a specific foreign corporation.
A foreign corporation that does not satisfy either of these two tests is treated as a qualified foreign corporation with respect to any dividend paid by such corporation if the stock with respect to which such dividend is paid is readily tradable on an established securities market in the United States.
In addition, rules were implemented with respect to transfers to and from foreign corporations to recognize the special status of foreign corporations in which U.
Controlled Foreign Corporation--Section 957 of the Internal Revenue Code defines a foreign corporation as being controlled if more than 50 percent of the total combined voting power of all classes of stock of such corporation entitled to vote, or more than 50 percent of the value of all its outstanding stock, is owned (directly, indirectly, or constructively) by U.
branch profits of a foreign corporation as a substitute for the dividend tax that applies to a foreign corporation with a U.
A foreign corporation will be classified as a PFIC if it satisfies an income test or an asset test.
Any American who owns more than 25 percent of the shares of a passive foreign corporation or any shares in a "U.
As an example of these rules, if a foreign corporation has a real estate business in the U.
Payments made to a foreign corporation that has a permanent place of business in California or is qualified through the secretary of State will not be subject to withholding.
corporation ("first-tier" subsidiaries) and any foreign corporations controlled by a directly-controlled foreign corporation ("second-tier" subsidiaries).
6011-4T(c)(3)(ii), a "taxpayer that is a shareholder in a foreign corporation will not be considered to have participated indirectly in a transaction to which the foreign corporation is a direct party merely because the taxpayer is a shareholder in the foreign corporation unless the taxpayer is a reporting shareholder .
However, this freedom is not granted to any foreign corporation doing business in the state.

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