capacity

(redirected from forced vital capacity)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Legal, Acronyms, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.
Related to forced vital capacity: pulmonary function test, forced expiratory volume, Restrictive Lung Disease

Capacity

Credit grantors' measurement of a person's ability to repay loans.

Capacity

The theoretical maximum number of products a company can produce at a given time. For example, an oil pump may have a capacity of X barrels per day, meaning that it cannot produce more than X. Companies rarely operate at full capacity, both to allow themselves leeway in the event of increased demand and because capacity may not be possible at a given time because of worker illness, machinery maintenance, or other reasons.

capacity

the maximum amount of output that a firm is physically capable of producing, at a point in time, given the fullest and most efficient use of its existing plant or plants.

Over time, a firm may adjust its capacity to meet changes in demand and the competitive situation facing it, investing in new plant or extending existing plant to meet an increase in demand, or closing down plant, permanently or temporarily (‘MOTHBALLING’), to meet a situation of OVERCAPACITY.

When preparing a PRODUCTION BUDGET, it is necessary to ensure that the firm has sufficient production capacity to meet planned output levels. A firm's capacity or the capacity of industry in general may be limited by the availability of capital equipment and labour.

The maximum rate of output which the firm can produce will depend upon the capacity of its individual factories which in turn depends upon the capacity of various departments and work stations within each factory See INPUT-OUTPUT CONTROL, PRODUCTION SCHEDULING, PRODUCTION-LINE BALANCING. See CAPACITY UTILIZATION, LIMITING FACTOR, RATIONALIZATION, INDIVISIBILITIES, CAPACITY CONSTRAINED RESOURCE, CAPACITY CONTROL, CAPACITY CUSHION, CAPACITY PLANNING, CAPACITY REQUIREMENTS PLANNING.

capacity

  1. 1the maximum amount of output that a firm or industry is physically capable of producing given the fullest and most efficient use of its existing plant. In microeconomic theory, the concept of full capacity is specifically related to the cost structures of firms and industries. Industry output is maximized (i.e. full capacity is attained) when all firms produce at the minimum point on their long-run average total cost curves (see PERFECT COMPETITION). If firms fail to produce at this point, then the result is EXCESS CAPACITY.
  2. in macroeconomics, capacity refers to POTENTIAL GROSS NATIONAL PRODUCT. The percentage relationship of actual output in the economy to capacity (i.e. potential national income) shows capacity utilization. See also MONOPOLISTIC COMPETITION.

capacity

The legal ability of parties to enter into contracts.
• Full capacity. Having unlimited ability to enter into binding contracts of all types.
• Limited capacity. Having the ability to enter into binding contracts for certain things, such as a minor's contracts for necessities, but also having the ability to disaffirm other contracts upon reaching legal age, for example.
• No capacity. Having no ability to enter into contracts, such as one who has been adjudicat- ed as mentally incompetent.

References in periodicals archive ?
Lung function typically is measured as forced vital capacity (FVC).
When performing spirometry, it is very useful to obtain a flow volume loop as well as SVC, because if the patient is obstructed, the SVC should be sigficantly larger than the forced vital capacity.
Of the 12 subjects with three or more months of follow-up, 92% experienced an improvement in the rate disease progression for the three month period after administration of NurOwn(TM), as measured by ALS Functional Rating Score-Revised (ALSFRS) or forced vital capacity (FVC).
Secondary endpoints included transition dyspnea index (TDI) score, trough FEV1, forced vital capacity (FVC) and safety and tolerability.
001) in forced vital capacity (FVC), forced expiratory volume in 1 second ([FEV.
The lung function measurements used were maximal mid expiratory flow rate (MMEF), forced vital capacity (FVC) and forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1).
The primary efficacy endpoint of the trial was a composite of two clinical measures - forced vital capacity (FVC) and 6-minute walk test (6MWT).
Patients with a progressive neuromuscular diagnosis qualify if their maximal inspiratory pressure (MIP) is less than sixty centimeters of water pressure or if their forced vital capacity is less than fifty percent of predicted.
Efficacy measures include the ALS Functional Rating Score-Revised (ALSFRS-R) and forced vital capacity (FVC).
Compared with patients receiving treatment with salmeterol plus fluticasone, patients receiving the combination of tiotropium plus formoterol experienced greater improvements in lung function, including superior improvements in forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1) and Forced Vital Capacity (FVC), two indicators of COPD severity.
Under the neurological criteria the patient must have a maximal inspiratory pressure less than sixty centimeter of water pressure or a forced vital capacity less than fifty percent of predicted.
Breathing capacity was measured by forced vital capacity (FVC), a reliable measure of respiratory function and an established clinical indicator in this neurodegenerative disorder.