flow

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Related to forced expiratory flow: forced expiratory volume

flow

a measurement of quantity over a specified period of time. Unlike a STOCK, which is not a function of time, a flow measures quantity passing per minute, hour, day or whatever. A common analogy is to a reservoir. The water entering and leaving the reservoir is a flow but the water actually in the reservoir at any one point in time is a stock. INCOME is a flow but WEALTH is a stock.
References in periodicals archive ?
The lung function was appreciated by spirometric testing (Cosmed Pony FX Desktop Spirometer,), with help of 2 parameters: forced vital capacity (FVC) and forced expiratory flow in one second ([FEV.
Maximum mid expiratory flow or Forced Expiratory Flow between 25% to 75% of the Vital capacity(FEF 25-75%) is indicative of early obstructive disease when the FEV1/FVC ratio is normal11.
The FEF[logical not]25-75 is the forced expiratory flow rate between 25 and 75 percent of the forced vital capacity.
In children, the forced expiratory flow over the middle half of forced vital capacity, or [FEF.
In normal subjects, Vcomp is small, but it should be taken into consideration in patients with airflow obstruction, as bronchodilator therapies may affect Vcomp in this circumstance, and the reduction in thoracic gas compression volume may create a reduction of the negative effect of this phenomenon on forced expiratory flow.
1]), forced expiratory flow at 50 and 75 per cent of the vital capacity (FEF 50 and 75%), forced expiratory flow between 25 and 75 per cent of the vital capacity ([FEF.
Although no studies looked specifically at exacerbation rates, multiple clinical and biologic outcomes (symptom scores, quality of life measures, bronchodilator use, forced expiratory flow in 1 second [FE[V.
Pulmonary function was also assessed by measuring the forced expiratory flow during the middle half of the FVC (FE[F.
Results: The investigators found that the vitamin supplements protected the study group from the decreases in forced expiratory flow, the amount of air dispelled from the lungs during a certain time period and peak expiratory volume, a measure of airway resistance, that were seen among those who received placebo pills.
Research now shows that infants exposed to smoke while in the uterus have as much as a 50% decrease in their forced expiratory flow rates, a measure of lung capacity.

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