Flag

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Flag

A pattern reflecting price fluctuations within a narrow range, generating a rectangular area on a graph both prior to and after sharp rises or declines.

Flag

In technical analysis, a situation on a chart in which a security's price undergoes a steep rise or fall, then trades within a narrow price range. When a steep rise proceeds the narrow trading, it looks somewhat like a flag raised on a pole. Many analysts believe that when a flag occurs, the narrow trading is only temporary and will soon be followed by another steep rise or fall. That is, a rise will follow a rise and a fall will follow a fall.

flag

See triangle.
References in classic literature ?
At first the rebellious spirit below found vent only in isolated shouts, street-crowd speeches, and newspaper suggestions; then it found much more definite expression in the appearance in the morning sunlight of American flags at point after point above the architectural cliffs of the city.
They cheered the flag by habit and tradition, they despised other nations, and whenever there was an international difficulty they were intensely patriotic, that is to say, they were ardently against any native politician who did not say, threaten, and do harsh and uncompromising things to the antagonist people.
That elephant there, I take it, stands for something in the nature of the Union Jack in the flag.
To the last-named place, Hugh and Dennis, still with their pupil between them, rushed straightway; Barnaby having given his flag into the hands of one of their own party, who kept them at the outer door.
The little group of black specks with the flag of white had been swept out of existence, and the stillness of the evening, so it seemed to me, had scarcely been broken.
That night a procession passed, by torchlight, through the streets, bearing in the midst the figure of a woman, enveloped with a richly embroidered mantle; while in advance stalked Jervase Helwyse, waving the red flag of the pestilence.
We afterwards learned that our eccentric friend had been a lieutenant in the English navy; but having disgraced his flag by some criminal conduct in one of the principal ports on the main, he had deserted his ship, and spent many years wandering among the islands of the Pacific, until accidentally being at Nukuheva when the French took possession of the place, he had been appointed pilot of the harbour by the newly constituted authorities.
Two very mild cheers went up from the dripping crowd on the pier; we answered them gently from the slippery decks; the flag made an effort to wave, and failed; the "battery of guns" spake not--the ammunition was out.
A sergeant of the battalion ran up and took the flag that was swaying from its weight in Prince Andrew's hands, but he was immediately killed.
With that answer she took the flag from me and thrust it impatiently into the breast-pocket of my jacket.
But she has erroneous ideas concerning the American flag and the protection it is supposed to symbolize.
But, singularly to say, a flag floating on the wind surmounted its cone, which emerged five or six feet out of water.