FISH

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FISH

An abbreviation for "first in, still here." The term is a tongue-in-cheek reference to the first in, first out accounting method. It refers to a company that keeps its inventory for a long time, often because of poor sales. Ultimately, this may render inventory obsolete. A company dealing with FISH may be in or near financial trouble.
References in periodicals archive ?
Fishing would be prohibited in the river, but not in Lake Casitas, which is nearly a mile west and contains a half-dozen varieties of fish popular with anglers.
The problems associated with individual fishing quotas--privatizing a publicly owned resource, dubious environmental benefits, and detrimental impacts on coastal communities--cannot be remedied solely through community fishing quotas.
It's not long ago that black families sent their children to the South during the summers to experience the magnificent scent of towering oak trees draped in Spanish moss and the crunching sounds of oyster shells along simple county roads that led to favorite fishing holes.
The reason the modern fishing crews didn't do better, despite employing fish-spotting sonar and massive nets, is simply that few cod remain to be caught, conclude Andrew A.
It also acknowledges the Hmong cultural tradition of fishing while showing which fish are safest to catch and ways to make fish safer to eat prior to cooking, including how to remove fins, fat, and other parts of the fish where toxicants accumulate.
As recently as 1980, the world's fishing fleets caught more than 99 percent of all salmon.
In the time-honored tug of war between man and fish, I'd wrestled my way to a victory, but the ultimate fly fishing achievement, a "grand slam," is another story.
Responsible fisheries limit their hauls--so fish populations can recover to their original numbers before the next fishing season.
Nowadays, Alabama's charter fishing boat captains and some local community groups buy and deploy specially designed concrete artificial reefs.
Some 750 million pounds of this so-called by-catch are wasted each year on the North Pacific fishing grounds alone.
Thousands of hopeful youngsters are coming to camp this year expectantly packing their fishing rods along.
Many men go fishing all their lives without knowing that it is not fish they are after.