FISH

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FISH

An abbreviation for "first in, still here." The term is a tongue-in-cheek reference to the first in, first out accounting method. It refers to a company that keeps its inventory for a long time, often because of poor sales. Ultimately, this may render inventory obsolete. A company dealing with FISH may be in or near financial trouble.
References in classic literature ?
At the end of six months what Kotick did not know about deep-sea fishing was not worth the knowing.
Then he settled himself cross-legged and arranged his fishing tackle.
I could not comprehend, therefore, why they so seldom sought it in their waters, for it was only at stated times that the fishing parties were formed, and these occasions were always looked forward to with no small degree of interest.
You may call a lake-fish that will weigh twenty or thirty pounds a serious matter, but to a man who has hauled in a shovel-nosed shirk, d’ye see, it’s but a poor kind of fishing after all.
Yes, general, and they seem to have had good luck in their fishing.
The Indians of this great fishing mart are represented by the earliest explorers as sleeker and fatter, but less hardy and active, than the tribes of the mountains and prairies, who live by hunting, or of the upper parts of the river, where fish is scanty, and the inhabitants must eke out their subsistence by digging roots or chasing the deer.
He nodded his head toward one end of the island opposite, and, looking steadily in the same direction, the other guest could see the dome of a bald head and the top of a fishing rod, both equally motionless, rising out of the tall undergrowth against the background of the stream beyond.
The neighbourhood of Streatley and Goring is a great fishing centre.
One night I was out fishing in the lagoon with Oti, the man who had been mulcted of the cowries.
The waters of the bay contain all manner of fish, wherefore its surface is ploughed by the keels of all manner of fishing boats manned by all manner of fishermen.
I found out from the coachman, among other matters, that there was a famous fishing stream near Barkingham; and the first thing I did, on arriving at the town, was to buy a rod and line.
Occasionally, after my hoeing was done for the day, I joined some impatient companion who had been fishing on the pond since morning, as silent and motionless as a duck or a floating leaf, and, after practising various kinds of philosophy, had concluded commonly, by the time I arrived, that he belonged to the ancient sect of Coenobites.