Firkin


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Firkin

An obsolete unit of volume equivalent to one-quarter of one barrel.
References in periodicals archive ?
Always measured by a factor of two, the firkin is the recognised imperial unit of excess.
A spokesman for owners Six Continents Retail, who decide to re-name the pub from New Year's Day, said, "Actually, most Swansea people never stopped calling the pub The Cricketers even when it was called The Fine Leg and Firkin.
A spokesman for the Fleet and Firkin apologised for staff being "over-zealous".
One reader reckons my team should change the name of their stadium from Fir Park to Firkin Park as it's no firkin use for football but there's always someone worse off than yourself.
The singer songwriter performed an intimate gig at The Flapper and Firkin pub in Birmingham last week as part of BRMB's Live at the Local sessions.
At the aptly-named Flanker and Firkin in New Union Street in the city centre, die-hard fans shook off the excesses of the night before with the hair of the dog and a full English.
For years the Victorian establishment, the Queen's Vaults, in Westgate Street, was known as the Fly Half and Firkin.
The former Cricketers pub overlooking the St Helen's rugby and cricket ground, was re-named the Fine Leg and Firkin in 1997, but after a refit later this month it will get its old name back.
Ireland's Cork City Ballet boasts that its annual performances, held in April, will take place in the Firkin Crane Theater, where Curran's company danced last November.
Until a daring Scots barman from Allied Domeq's Fiddle and Firkin pub in The Hague secretly flew home to buy a haggis.
Jock Andrew, assistant manager of the Philanthropist and Firkin in St Albans, Herts, said last night: "It's been a huge success.