Fire

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Fire

Somewhat informal; to terminate the employment of an employee. An employee may be fired for cause, such as for sexual harassment or absenteeism, or, in many cases, without cause. A fired employee is often eligible to collect unemployment insurance for a certain period of time.
References in classic literature ?
But, for months after she was settled in the new little house, her eye never fell on the space where the fireplace should have been without a bitter feeling of revolt sweeping over her.
Saying this, the judge pointed with his finger to the third drawer of the press, near the fireplace.
When the appointment of a new minister was gazetted in the "Moniteur," and the greater or lesser officials, clustering round the stoves or before the fireplaces and shaking in their shoes, asked themselves: "What will he do?
Julian sprung restlessly to his feet, and disturbed the cat at the fireplace.
Just fancy those lovely old dogs sitting by the fireplace in my house of dreams," said Anne rapturously.
The next winter I used a small cooking-stove for economy, since I did not own the forest; but it did not keep fire so well as the open fireplace.
The very first thing she did was to look whether there was a fire in the fireplace, and she was quite pleased to find that there was a real one, blazing away as brightly as the one she had left behind.
The big living room, with its huge fireplace, divans, shelves and tables of books and magazines, was the center of things.
I walked farther into the room, and stood opposite to him on the rug before the fireplace.
How the other pen found its way into the bowl instead of the fireplace or wastepaper basket I can't imagine, but there the two were, lying side by side, both encrusted with ink and completely undistinguishable from each other.
It came from a rather stout lady of comfortable appearance, who was seated beside the fireplace in the bar, blowing the fire to make the kettle boil for tea.
The old neglected palazzo, with its lofty carved ceilings and frescoes on the walls, with its floors of mosaic, with its heavy yellow stuff curtains on the windows, with its vases on pedestals, and its open fireplaces, its carved doors and gloomy reception rooms, hung with pictures--this palazzo did much, by its very appearance after they had moved into it, to confirm in Vronsky the agreeable illusion that he was not so much a Russian country gentleman, a retired army officer, as an enlightened amateur and patron of the arts, himself a modest artist who had renounced the world, his connections, and his ambition for the sake of the woman he loved.