position

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Position

A market commitment; the number of contracts bought or sold for which no offsetting transaction has been entered into. The buyer of a commodity is said to have a long position, and the seller of a commodity is said to have a short position. Related: Open contracts.

Position

The state of owning or owing a security or other asset. One has a long position when one owns something, while one has a short position when something is sold, especially sold short. See also: Close a position.

position

The ownership status of a person's or an institution's investments. For example, a person may own 500 shares of Sun Microsystems, 350 shares of Boeing, and a $10,000 principal amount of 9% bonds due in 2001. See also long position, short position.

position

To buy or sell securities in order to establish a net long or a net short position. Also called take a position.
References in periodicals archive ?
The Rock Band 3 Squier Stratocaster uses technology built into the neck and fingerboard of the guitar to track finger positions in real time.
The rubber-covered casing with useful impressions in the finger positions is especially tactile and makes them really comfortable to hold.
Dynamic fretboard that shows finger positions synchronized with the scrolling music notation (lefties can invert the fretboard)
Display a fretboard (for any fretted instrument with 4 to 7 strings) or piano keyboard that shows finger positions
Capacitive solutions such as Synaptics ClearTouch use a grid of conductive traces implemented on a clear substrate such as polyethylene terephthalate (PET) film or glass to accurately report one or more finger positions and relative pressure on a sensor.
The games include the single player Rocker's Challenge - where players try to strum to the built in lights while matching the finger positions and play through the complete song; the multi-player Shredder's Tourney - where up to 4 players are challenged to compete and play a section of the song; and Blast Jam - where players have full control to create their own jams.
Finally, it's time to put all that practice and hard work to the test in step three, incorporating strumming and finger positions with both hands, just like a real guitar.