felony

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felony

A crime that carries the possibility of a sentence in excess of one year.Violation of some real estate laws is classified as a felony.

References in periodicals archive ?
Thirty-three percent of Americans feel felons should be allowed to vote, according to the FindLaw survey.
In Wichita, a felon brought a shotgun to the undercover BATFE, storefront.
com/) gun shows every few months , or have judges who liberally reinstate gun ownership rights to those with past violent crime convictions, or have fairly easy petition processes for gun-ownership reinstatement to felons.
9) Several circuit courts have interpreted this exception to mean that "[i]f state law has restored civil rights to a felon, without expressly limiting the felon's firearms privileges, that felon is not subject to federal firearms disabilities.
Kaine's effort to enfranchise felons who have completed their prison sentences.
Maine and Vermont, which have some of the lowest black populations in the country, are the only states that allow all current and former felons to vote.
Part I of this note places felon disenfranchisement in a historical context, highlights significant cases and jurisprudence under the Fourteenth Amendment and the Voting Rights Act, and reviews the scope of its impact today.
First and foremost, this is a compelling story that brings a criminal case to life, and provides significant insights into how capital punishment cases were adjudicated and how communities and families weighed in on the ultimate sentencing of convicted felons.
Felon disenfranchisement laws deny the right to vote to a whopping 2.
Common sense, basic fairness and decency dictate that felons, with few exceptions, should have their voting rights restored after they have done their time.
The report's suggestions were based on recent data concerning the number of felons who commit crimes after being released from state jails.
During his two terms as VP, Marin had pardoned 533 felons, some convicted for grave crimes such as murder and rape.