fees


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Fee

An agreed-upon, stated amount one pays for a service or privilege. For example, one may be required to pay a fee to attend college, to open an account with a brokerage, or to do any number of other things. Fees are stated and are usually standardized for the person or organization receiving them.

fees

the payments to professional persons such as lawyers and accountants for performing services on behalf of clients.
References in periodicals archive ?
Investment advice fees are subject to the 2% floor under regulations applicable to individual taxpayers; thus, the fees are a cost that individual taxpayers are capable of incurring.
Included in it was new IRC section 62(a)(20) which provides an above-the-line deduction for legal fees and court costs incurred in connection with discrimination awards.
While award fee arrangements should be structured to motivate excellent contractor performance, award fees must be commensurate with contractor performance over a range from satisfactory to excellent performance.
Virginia has been charging a 50-cent fee on each new tire sold in the state since 1989.
Pay-to-play fees don't work," says Joseph Cappuzzello, the athletic director at Girard High School in Girard, Ohio.
On deciding that Negrin had a valid claim for consumer fraud, the Court rejected Norwest's argument that since Negrin was aware of the fax fee and recording charge well before she closed on the sale of her condominium apartment, no fraud was committed.
An automated teller machine operator may impose a fee on a consumer for initiating an electronic fund transfer or a balance inquiry only if
Despite the fee changes, McFadden says Thunder Bay's terminal and landing fees remain "well below" the industry average.
In a pricey market, seniors are generally more reluctant to pay relatively high, $3,000-a-month plus service fees rather than committing to a one-time entry fee with a lower monthly service fee.
The Wisconsin case is only one skirmish in a long feud over the constitutionality of using public universities' student activity fees to fund political groups.
In defending bounty hunters, governments sometimes draw a parallel to the taxpayer who retains a contingent fees valuation firm, attorney, accountant, or other adviser.