Fascism

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Fascism

A political system characterized by extreme nationalism. When it emerged in the early 20th century, it rejected both left-wing and right-wing thought and advocated a system in which the citizens of a nation work together for a common goal (usually under the command of a strong leader). Fascism is noted for corporatist economic policies, in which interests of the state, businesses and workers cooperate to set policies. It is strongly associated with racism and/or expansionism.
References in periodicals archive ?
French fascism poses especially trenchant problems for those who like their terms defined.
A useful definition of fascism might free up the discussion and let historians get down to the actual work of investigating extremist groups and their activities.
Yet because Bucard's followers never exceeded a couple of thousand and he had to make up in commitment what Francisme lacked in numbers, Pierre Milza concludes in his reliable survey that Francisme was an example of true fascism that never established French roots.
F was a pure copy, of Italian fascismo that had more in common with the nationalist leagues of the 1890s than with fascism.
is still considered in most quarters to have been the most likely repository of interwar fascism in France.
Indeed, in Lugones' view Argentina's was an altogether more Christianized fascism, which, if anything, gave it a religious edge that was dulled in Italy.
So, unlike fascism in Italy, fascism in Argentina was never "defeated"--a situation that left a residual memory of possibility that was potent enough to be adopted by Peronists and anti-Peronists alike (in a different conjuncture) to justify savagery in the name of their sacred cause.
First is the fact that this Argentine historian tackles perhaps the most bounded of all political formations, namely, fascism.
In the 1930s, European Communists targeted fascism as an especially insidious enemy.
Much of today's talk about fascism derives from a third motive--a thinly disguised reductio ad Hitlerum.
But the final and most fundamental reason for the establishment Right's antifascist pretensions is a deeply rooted leftist mindset in which fascism remains the world's greatest evil.
The Soviet dictatorship became what Truman described after World War II as "Red Fascism.