Agriculture

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Related to farming: Organic farming, Poultry farming

Agriculture

The production of food through the raising of crops and/or animals. The development of agriculture approximately 9,000 years ago is considered to be one of the most important revolutions in human thinking, one that made civilization possible. The trade of agricultural products, such as wheat or coffee, gave rise to the first exchanges. Even now, agricultural products are among the most important commodities that are traded. Very often, agriculture may only be performed in certain areas. Zoning laws regulate where farming and ranching may or may not take place. See also: Agribusiness.
References in periodicals archive ?
In fact, almost three out of every four residential farm households lost money in their farming operations.
We need to move toward how to deal with urbanization with a commodity that's focused on the farming aspect.
As the economic value of farming increased, the cost of farmland increased, as well.
Bill Duesing, president of the Connecticut-based Northeast Organic Farming Association, is impressed by the growing number of campus gardens.
Rex Dalton, writing in the September 2004 issue of Nature, cited pollution-related issues at salmon pens in Canada and diseases stemming from tuna farming in Mexico.
Salmon farming is slowly reducing the amount of fish available for human consumption.
Use of the cash method allows qualifying farming businesses to pay taxes only on the income they have actually collected, thus helping cashflow, while still maintaining their books on an accrual basis for financial statement presentation, to better assess their financial position.
Farming is not only a business but first and foremost stewardship, Burke adds.
For while farming conditions in Uganda may differ from those on the Berkshire Downs, the principles of soil conservation, chemical-free pest prevention and biodiversity still apply.
12) Various local studies on landholding covering the period from the 1820s to the 1850s suggest that a quarter to a half of the farming population rented their land.
But a look at the economics of vegetable farming shows that the trade-off does not work as neatly as farmers claim and workers fear.