family

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Related to extended family: Joint family

family

Traditionally, people who are related by blood or marriage. The term can mean many different things depending on the circumstances. Most statutes have a section devoted to “definitions” that will tell you the intended definition of words used in the law. For example, the concept of what constitutes a family may be important in zoning cases for single-family housing or apartment restrictions against non-family members living in the apartment with the tenant.

References in periodicals archive ?
They were eventually made to accept placement of Jada in her extended family was the best option" Solicitor Nigel Priestley
the family and extended family members of any person who has served in the armed forces of the United States of America and has not been dishonorably discharged or separated from such service; and
The paper attempts to determine how the women's extended family responsibilities affect their career trajectories.
The family and extended family resident in the household lived in style, at least by Harlem standards.
Although important outcomes of this movement included better schools and improved housing conditions, these new residential patterns dislocated many African Americans from predominantly Black social outlets and extended family networks (Tatum, 1999).
THE TRADITIONAL TREATMENT OF MARITAL PROBLEMS AND THE PSYCHO-SOCIAL SUPPORT OF THE EXTENDED FAMILY
By sniffing, the squirrels can detect distant members of their extended family, yet they still treat them like outsiders, she reports in the April 7 Proceedings of the Royal Society of London B.
Many immigrants who arrive without extended family and a social safety net are drawn to congregations.
25, 1998) have blossomed into an extended family of new mixing tips, and more are in development.
She doesn't divulge secrets, betraying neither her extended family nor her class.
In addition to information about her re-naming herself, we learn in this interview that she also pieced together an extended family of "grandmothers," "uncles," and "cousins": "Because we came from a tiny family (my mother was an orphan, and my father the son of a runaway), I was always looking for grandmothers because I didn't have any, and everybody else had some.
Soon people came by, took pity on us and lent a hand--and became the first members of our extended family.

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