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Export

A good produced in one country and sold to a customer in another country. Exports bring money into the producing country; for that reason, many economists believe that a nation's proper balance of trade means more exports are sold than imports bought. Exports may be difficult to sell in some countries, as the importers may put up various protectionist measures such as import quotas and tariffs. Most governments seek to promote exports, while they have differing positions on imports. See also: Free trade, NAFTA.

export

A good or service that is produced in one country and then sold to and consumed in another country. Because many companies are heavily dependent on exports for sales, any factors such as government policies or exchange rates that affect exports can have significant impact on corporate profits. Compare import. See also balance of trade.

export

  1. a good which is produced in the home country and which is then physically transported to, and sold in, an overseas market earning foreign exchange for the home country (visible export).
  2. a service which is provided for foreigners either in the home country (for example visits by tourists) or overseas (for example banking, insurance) which likewise generates foreign exchange for the home country (invisible export).
  3. capital which is placed abroad in the form of portfolio investment, foreign direct investment in physical assets, and banking deposits (capital export). See FOREIGN INVESTMENT.

    Together these items comprise, along with IMPORTS, a country's BALANCE OF PAYMENTS. See INTERNATIONAL TRADE, EXPORTING, EXPORT CREDIT GUARANTEE DEPARTMENT, EXPORT RESTRAINT AGREEMENT, EXPORT SUBSIDY.

Exportclick for a larger image
Fig. 68 Export. (a) UK goods and services exports, 2003.

(b) Geographical distribution of UK goods/services exports, 2003. Source: UK Balance of Payments, ONS, 2004.

export

a good, service or capital asset that is sold to foreign countries. (i) A good that is produced in the home country and is then physically transported to, and sold in, an overseas market, earning foreign exchange for the home country, is called a visible export. (ii) A service that is provided for foreigners either in the home country (for example, visits by tourists) or overseas (for example, banking, insurance) which likewise generates foreign exchange for the home country is called an invisible export. (iii) Capital that is placed abroad in the form of portfolio investment, foreign direct investment in physical assets and banking deposits is called a capital export. Exports are important in two main respects:
  1. together with IMPORTS they make up a country's BALANCE OF PAYMENTS - a country must export in order to finance (‘pay for’ in foreign currency terms) its imports. The combined net payment figures (exports minus imports) for (i), (ii) and (iii) are shown in Fig. 13 (a), BALANCE OF PAYMENTS entry.
  2. they represent an ‘injection’ into the CIRCULAR FLOW OF NATIONAL INCOME, serving to raise real income and output. In 2003, exports accounted for 20% of gross final expenditure (GFE) on domestically produced output (GFE minus imports = GROSS NATIONAL PRODUCT). See Fig. 133 (b) , NATIONAL INCOME ACCOUNTS entry Fig. 68 gives details of the product composition and geographical distribution of UK (merchandise) goods exports in 2003. See Fig. 84 , for comparable import data (IMPORT entry). See INTERNATIONAL TRADE, EXPORT MULTIPLIER, C.I.F. ( COST- INSURANCE-FREIGHT), F.O.B. ( FREE-ONBOARD), CERTIFICATE OF ORIGIN, INSURANCE, FACTORING, FORFAITING, EXPORT SUBSIDY, EXPORT RESTRAINT AGREEMENT, FOREIGN INVESTMENT, EXCHANGE RATE, EXCHANGE RATE EXPOSURE, TERMS OF TRADE.
References in periodicals archive ?
Supporting Export Award: A business with turnover |up to PS500m that does not export itself, but plays a key role in supporting our region's exporters to trade overseas.
There is a significant difference between current status of trade information and the exporters desired status.
TIM's President Mehmet Buyukeksi said in his part that foreign exchange rates were one of the major problems exporters had to deal with nowadays.
With FFB closing its doors in March 2009, members received a boost at the event, when FFB client development account manager John Whitehead launched a Food and Drink Exporters Association to take over the FFB's representation of UK businesses.
Speciality Exporter of the Year, Sponsored by Artisan and Fine Food Digest: Gourmets Choice
We (hold the event) to use the inspirational stories of the successful exporters out there to spread the word and raise awareness, to let (companies) know there are opportunities in the world markets,"
A free download of Virtools Exporter for LightWave is available from the Virtools web site at http://www.
Arguably, the lower income countries of Indonesia, Philippines, and Thailand have the lowest export overlap with Japanese exporters and thus face the least threat from this front, though Indonesia would suffer from its position as a supplier of raw materials and crude oil to Japan in the face of a weak yen.
SOME OF Australia's leading exporters joined Foreign Minister Alexander Downer at a Top Exporters Dinner held in Adelaide earlier this month.
market began more recently and has resulted in a concentration of exporter underwriters.
While this language shifts the onus to the exporter to prove products are safe, Stabinsky notes, the protocol's preamble confuses the issue.