export


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Export

A good produced in one country and sold to a customer in another country. Exports bring money into the producing country; for that reason, many economists believe that a nation's proper balance of trade means more exports are sold than imports bought. Exports may be difficult to sell in some countries, as the importers may put up various protectionist measures such as import quotas and tariffs. Most governments seek to promote exports, while they have differing positions on imports. See also: Free trade, NAFTA.

export

A good or service that is produced in one country and then sold to and consumed in another country. Because many companies are heavily dependent on exports for sales, any factors such as government policies or exchange rates that affect exports can have significant impact on corporate profits. Compare import. See also balance of trade.

export

  1. a good which is produced in the home country and which is then physically transported to, and sold in, an overseas market earning foreign exchange for the home country (visible export).
  2. a service which is provided for foreigners either in the home country (for example visits by tourists) or overseas (for example banking, insurance) which likewise generates foreign exchange for the home country (invisible export).
  3. capital which is placed abroad in the form of portfolio investment, foreign direct investment in physical assets, and banking deposits (capital export). See FOREIGN INVESTMENT.

    Together these items comprise, along with IMPORTS, a country's BALANCE OF PAYMENTS. See INTERNATIONAL TRADE, EXPORTING, EXPORT CREDIT GUARANTEE DEPARTMENT, EXPORT RESTRAINT AGREEMENT, EXPORT SUBSIDY.

Exportclick for a larger image
Fig. 68 Export. (a) UK goods and services exports, 2003.

(b) Geographical distribution of UK goods/services exports, 2003. Source: UK Balance of Payments, ONS, 2004.

export

a good, service or capital asset that is sold to foreign countries. (i) A good that is produced in the home country and is then physically transported to, and sold in, an overseas market, earning foreign exchange for the home country, is called a visible export. (ii) A service that is provided for foreigners either in the home country (for example, visits by tourists) or overseas (for example, banking, insurance) which likewise generates foreign exchange for the home country is called an invisible export. (iii) Capital that is placed abroad in the form of portfolio investment, foreign direct investment in physical assets and banking deposits is called a capital export. Exports are important in two main respects:
  1. together with IMPORTS they make up a country's BALANCE OF PAYMENTS - a country must export in order to finance (‘pay for’ in foreign currency terms) its imports. The combined net payment figures (exports minus imports) for (i), (ii) and (iii) are shown in Fig. 13 (a), BALANCE OF PAYMENTS entry.
  2. they represent an ‘injection’ into the CIRCULAR FLOW OF NATIONAL INCOME, serving to raise real income and output. In 2003, exports accounted for 20% of gross final expenditure (GFE) on domestically produced output (GFE minus imports = GROSS NATIONAL PRODUCT). See Fig. 133 (b) , NATIONAL INCOME ACCOUNTS entry Fig. 68 gives details of the product composition and geographical distribution of UK (merchandise) goods exports in 2003. See Fig. 84 , for comparable import data (IMPORT entry). See INTERNATIONAL TRADE, EXPORT MULTIPLIER, C.I.F. ( COST- INSURANCE-FREIGHT), F.O.B. ( FREE-ONBOARD), CERTIFICATE OF ORIGIN, INSURANCE, FACTORING, FORFAITING, EXPORT SUBSIDY, EXPORT RESTRAINT AGREEMENT, FOREIGN INVESTMENT, EXCHANGE RATE, EXCHANGE RATE EXPOSURE, TERMS OF TRADE.
References in periodicals archive ?
Saed Al Awadi, chief executive officer of Dubai Exports, said the growth in exports was enabled through diversification of products and opening of business channels in new markets.
Government contractors do have some additional hoops to jump through to obtain export tax benefits.
Kicked off by the excess supply created by Germany's mandated collection system in the early '90s, recovered fiber exports have been a mainstay of many merchants' business plans.
The Federation of International Trade Associations offers a directory of export management companies at www.
Seventy-five percent of all applications to export controlled items to Hong Kong were approved in 2002, with 21 percent returned without action, usually because a license was not necessary, and only 4 percent denied.
16) Don't assume that you or your staff have to be experts in every area of export activity before you can get started, instead supplement your internal abilities with externally supplied know-how.
Even with lower exports and flat domestic use in 2002-03, wheat carryover stocks are expected to tighten for the third consecutive year to 550 million bushels or 26 percent of annual use.
But he does believe stronger external market controls can be a part of the export trade's future.
The interagency patchwork developed shortly after World War II, when the United States and its allies erected the Coordinating Committee for Multilateral Export Controls (CoCom), an export control alliance commonly referred to as NATO's economic arm.
Today, exporters face intense pressure to offer their customers more liberal terms of payment to compete with foreign suppliers, and they're using export credit insurance as a tool.