Expatriate

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Expatriate

An employee who is a U.S. citizen living and working in a foreign country.

Expatriate

An employee at a company who is a citizen of another country. Some governments require companies hiring expatriates to show cause that the job could not be performed by a local citizen. Expatriates are generally subject to taxation only in the country where they are working, though citizens of the United States often must pay American taxes as well as local taxes, depending on their levels of income. See also: Foreign Tax Credit.
References in periodicals archive ?
There was an allowance for a taxpayer to request a ruling substantiating that the expatriation was not for tax avoidance.
The AJCA attempted to strengthen the provisions of HIPAA because there was still a significant amount of public debate on the merits of expatriation and the loss of tax revenues.
877A subjects a "covered expatriate" to tax on gains in excess of $600,000 from a deemed sale of an individual's worldwide assets on the day prior to that individual's expatriation.
The taxpayer's net worth on the date of expatriation is $2 million or more; or
Note A careful projection of an individual's travel and lifestyle plans and alternatives is required to evaluate the tax risks of expatriation.
tax on worldwide income and to set the clock running on the 10-year period, wealthy expatriates must demonstrate they have been tax-compliant for at least five previous years and file an information disclosure statement with the IRS, describing their act of expatriation and providing financial information.
Expatriates, in order to avoid being taxed on worldwide income, musts ever physical ties with the United States, which is evidenced by presence in the United States for no more than 30 days in each year in the 10-year period after expatriation.
source income and gains for a 10-year period following expatriation.
Inclusion of these merger-related expatriations is the reason that D&H report an overall rise in share prices around inversion announcement dates.
In this study, we seek to provide empirical evidence on whether Congressional action is needed to constrain future expatriations of U.
These claims have elevated public and legislative concern that the expatriation trend could continue.
7 percent in response to expatriation announcements.