exogenous money

exogenous money

that part of the MONEY SUPPLY that is ‘put into’ the economic system from outside by the government, as opposed to being created inside the system by the banking sector (ENDOGENOUS MONEY). See MONEY SUPPLY SCHEDULE.
References in periodicals archive ?
Examples of specific topics discussed include the concept of fundamental uncertainty as the key contribution of The General Theory to economic theory; the rise and fall of Keynesian macroeconomics; the comparability of The General Theory to the New Keynesian synthesis in relation to modelers of interest rate rules and the assumptions of endogenous and exogenous money supply; Keynes in relation to the theories of Milton Friedman, Karl Marx, Piero Sraffa, and Nicholas Kaldor; comparative theories of interest in Keynesian, classical, neoclassical, and Marxian economics; and extending Keynes' theory through the interpretation of money as a public monopoly.
Kaldor's initial attack (1970) was on the narrower interpretation and he very effectively challenged its assumptions of a stable demand for money function and a (potentially) exogenous money supply under the control of the monetary authorities.
We examine two monetary policy rules--an exogenous money growth rule and an interest rate rule based on Taylor (1993)--and two price adjustment mechanisms--flexible prices found in a typical real business cycle (RBC) model and sticky prices found in a typical New Keynesian model.
Kimball (1995), for example, examined a sticky-price model that assumed a constant velocity of money and an exogenous money supply rule.
Two classes of monetary policy regimes are considered: a regime in which the central bank follows an exogenous money growth rule and a regime with a nominal interest rate rule in which money growth is endogenous.
In addition to an exogenous money supply, older monetarism, he says, rested on two pillars: a stable aggregate demand-for-money function and the expectations-augmented Phillips curve.
The fundamental proposition says that one cannot have a nominal income equilibrium not pinned down by an at least partly exogenous money supply and without a stable aggregate demand-for-money function [Patinkin, 1965, pp.
Laidler takes money seriously because he believes that in the real world there is a significant amount of exogenous money and because, over reasonable stretches of time, the aggregate demand for money is a relatively stable function of permanent income, nominal interest rates, and the rate of inflation.
The first part of the Girton and Roper paper, dealing with exogenous money supplies, relies heavily on two assumptions.