Ethics


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Ethics

Standards of conduct or moral judgment.

Ethics

The study and practice of appropriate behavior, regardless of the behavior's legality. Certain industries have professional organizations setting and promoting certain ethical standards. For example, an accountant may be required to refrain from engaging in aggressive accounting, even when a particular type of aggressive accounting is not illegal. Professional organizations may censure or revoke the licenses of those professionals who are found to have violated the ethical standards of their fields.

In investing, ethics helps inform the investment decisions of some individuals and companies. For example, an individual may have a moral objection to smoking and therefore refrain from investing in tobacco companies. Ethics may be both positive and negative in investing; that is, it may inform where an individual makes investments (e.g. in environmentally friendly companies) and where he/she does not (e.g. in arms manufacturers). Some mutual funds and even whole subdivisions are dedicated to promoting ethical investing. See also: Green fund, Islamic finance.
References in periodicals archive ?
Three general questions have been raised for teaching in accounting ethics: Can professional ethics be taught by accounting educators to accounting students?
Ethics reform can take place at the city level, the county level, the regional level, or the state level.
This collection of transcripts would make an excellent primary text for use in ethics courses or in courses requiring deeper understanding of postmodernism and communication scholarship.
Professor Somerville holds that by developing a sense of the "sacredness of a human being that is not dependent on anything but his or her biological and psychological characteristics, one can develop an ethics that will respect the dignity of all.
So long as fear is present in an organization, ethics, the base component of organizational culture, are threatened.
Now, we call for the entire Ethics Commission to resign so former members can speak freely against this phony measure and lead the campaign for tough ethics laws and an independent commission to enforce them.
The health care ethics conversations of the 21st century are richly diverse and vibrant.
The most vocal opponents of the call for increased ethics education are committed proponents of the neoclassical economics paradigm, who seem to perceive ethics education as a threat to their conception of accounting.
The 2003-2004 Ethics Committee is composed of seven ACA members, and all serve a 3-year term.
If the mushrooming demand for ethics consultants is any guide, many feel they don't have a choice.