Erosion

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Erosion

A negative impact on one or more of a firm's existing assets.

Erosion

1. The gradual loss of an asset's value. See also: Depreciation.

2. The wearing away of real estate caused by natural events. For example, a rising sea level may erode a beach front property. Erosion can reduce the property's value.

erosion

The slow wearing away by natural forces such as water and wind.

References in periodicals archive ?
The ESD's were approximately 74 cm for the uneroded [ILLUSTRATION FOR FIGURE 1A OMITTED], 60 cm for the slightly eroded [ILLUSTRATION FOR FIGURE 1B OMITTED], 42 cm for the moderately eroded [ILLUSTRATION FOR FIGURE 1C OMITTED], and 10 cm for the severely eroded [ILLUSTRATION FOR FIGURE 1D OMITTED].
More severely eroded soils had thinner solums than the less severely eroded soils except for the Clarion soil.
About 5 microscopic fossils eroded from the Colorado Plateau that are found nowhere else.
However, Standard & Poor's feels that LAL's modest market position will be eroded by low cost competitors, with well-respected brands and direct customer access.
That's good news for proponents of life on Mars, because the field would have steered away charged particles, belonging to the solar wind, that would otherwise have eroded the planet's atmosphere.
A large number of Mexican sugar producers are highly leveraged, which forced them to dump sugar in the domestic market for liquidity reasons, which further eroded the domestic pricing environment.
In contrast, narrow canyons cut into the side of the slope off New Jersey, giving it the look of an eroded mountain range, and the Louisiana seafloor bears marks of numerous craters, created by the eruption of buried salt deposits.
On a stand-alone basis, profitability is good but the negative outlook reflects the pressure on LAL's resources caused by the pensions mis-selling review and Standard & Poor's expectation that the company's market position will be eroded through a high cost distribution channel.
In a recent issue of the British Journal of Sports Medicine, Milosevic reported the case of a 23-year-old cross-country and marathon runner whose upper teeth had eroded through the enamel to the tissue underneath.
Some of Yosemite's 1,400 parking spaces for visitors were eroded by January's devastating floods.
In fact, as an adjunct to the mechanical dentistry best symbolized by the pick and drill, these treatments promise to help preserve much of the dentist's handiwork -- from fillings to caps and crowns -- that might otherwise be lost as subsequent decay eroded the teeth onto which these were anchored.
Badlands'' now generically refers to most any landscape with elevated areas that have been severely eroded and deeply cut by ravines and small canyons.