block

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Related to epidural block: epidural anesthesia, spinal block

Block

Large quantity of stock or large dollar amount of bonds held or traded. As a rule of thumb, 10,000 shares or more of stock and $200,000 or more worth of bonds would be described as a block.

Block

An exceptionally large amount or value of securities. While there is no specific definition of how many shares constitute a block, most people using the term refer to holding or trading more than 10,000 shares and/or shares worth more than $200,000. Almost invariably, trades of this magnitude involve institutional investors. See also: Block trade, Secondary issue.

block

A large amount of a security, usually 10,000 shares or more.

block

An area bounded by perimeter streets.Many subdivision descriptions employ a subdivision name,and then a block number and a lot number to identify particular properties.The numbers are assigned when the subdivision developer files its plat plan with local authorities.

References in periodicals archive ?
The intradural space: the fourth place to go astray during epidural block.
The paravertebral block produces predominantly unilateral sympathetic blockade compared to bilateral sympathetic blockade after thoracic epidural block.
All patients were preloaded with 15 mL/kg of Ringer's lactate solution over 15 minutes before administering epidural block.
Rastogi B, et al [14] found dexmedetomidine to be effective adjuvant with ropivacaine for epidural block in prolonging the duration of motor block and analgesia with adequate sedation and minimal adverse events.
According to their findings, up to 7% of epidural needles may be partly placed in the subdural space during the performance of an epidural block (25).
A unilateral epidural block was suspected (confirming the intraoperative suspicion of inadequate epidural analgesia) so the epidural catheter was manipulated and a bolus of bupivacaine 0.
75% ropivacaine in both the groups as the volume of the study drug because the influence of height and weight on the spread of epidural block is very little and usually not clinically relevant unless considering the extremes of the spectrum.
On day one the epidural block was ineffective in controlling his pain.
Epidural block with a catheter technique is technically somewhat more difficult, but offers the possibilities of extending the block during surgery and of pain relief with a local anaesthetic and/or opioids in the postoperative period.
The success of caudal epidural block depends on the correct identification of the sacral hiatus and caudal epidural space.