Slavery

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Related to enslavement: servile

Slavery

The practice in which one person owns another person, or at least that person's labor. In either case, the owner does not compensate the slave for his/her work. Slavery is one of the world's oldest institutions. In the modern world, it is considered one of the most egregious human rights violations. It is illegal in nearly every country, but still exists. In the present, it is strongly associated with sexual trafficking and forced domestic servants.
References in periodicals archive ?
Furthermore, as money became abundant, and the Seminoles could be recognized as independent from the Creeks, Seminole enslavement resembled European chattel enslavement (Littlefield, 1977; Robertson, 2008).
If they could understand that they were encountering a woman in masculine disguise, viewers of this picture in the antislavery press might then reflect upon the particular horrors that enslavement held for Black women.
Walker's text anticipates most of the practices embedded in the new body of African-American historical studies and novels on enslavement published after the sixties, which like her work pays attention to the agency and self-representations of the enslaved; privileges description of their community-and culture-building energies; exhibits forms of resistance; and interrogates the myths and stereotypes disseminated in Anglo-American representations.
Resistance, meanwhile, is either "prepolitical nonrevolutionary self-assertion"--including forms of day-to-day resistance such as lying, stealing, dissembling, shirking, murder, infanticide, suicide, and arson--or "political responses" to enslavement, such as flight or collective violence against the system (Roll 597-98, 591).
The only political choice we are given, therefore, is between different forms of enslavement.
The essays begin by exposing the role that the transoceanic abduction and enslavement of Africans played in excluding black people from every normal human consideration and prerogative defined by American culture.
They do a fine job portraying the ways the law served the interests of planters and reflected the resistance of many slaves to their enslavement.
At sundown today, Jewish families will begin observing the centuries-old tradition of Passover with the ritual retelling of the Jews' flight from Egyptian enslavement.
She also finds that, like black male intellectuals of the time, the women struggled with the conundra of representation--how to speak responsibly in their own relatively educated voices on behalf of the folk--and of authenticity--how their own relatively elite identities might correspond to an Afrocentric selfhood and whether, indeed, an Afrocentric identity could anywhere survive the distorting pressures of enslavement and racism.
It's an important moment, as Jews recount the historic exodus from enslavement in Egypt.
A Cross of Thorns: The Enslavement of California's Indians by the Spanish Missions blends California with Native American history and culture to consider a chapter of California history that is less known than most; the enslavement of California's Indian population by Spanish missionaries from 1769 to 1821.
He exposes how the Thirteenth Amendment's exception clause--allowing for enslavement as "punishment for a crime"--has inaugurated forms of racial capitalist misogynist incarceration that serve as haunting returns of conditions African people endured in the barracoons and slave ship holds of the Middle Passage, on plantations, and in chattel slavery.