endorsement

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Endorsement

1. The payee's signature on the back of a check indicating that the payee has received the check. Banks require that payees endorse checks before they may be cashed or deposited.

2. An amendment to a document, especially an insurance policy. Informally, they are called riders.

endorsement

An owner's signature that serves to transfer the legal rights to a negotiable certificate to another party.

endorsement

(also spelled indorsement) Placing one's signature on the back of a check or other negotiable instrument in order to transfer ownership to another.Endorsers warrant payment of the instrument unless they sign with the additional words “without recourse.”

References in periodicals archive ?
1) Therefore, newspaper endorsements are orthogonal to the prediction market daily prices, absent any endorsement effect.
Which is more powerful: 300 endorsements or 3 recommendations?
The courts are grappling with issues such as which entities qualify as insureds under the endorsements, whether and to what extent insurers may subrogate against such insureds, and to what degree the endorsements apply to inter-insurer disputes.
The FTC's Endorsement Guides are advisory only, but they provide valuable insight into how the FTC will evaluate endorsements when deciding if a company's marketing program is false or misleading.
Celebrity endorsements are the more broadly employed scheme of utilizing celebrities as a promotional instrument.
IMA's endorsement recognizes curricula that align with that level of expectation.
In the box showing your endorsements for that skill, un-check the box that says "Show all endorsements for this skill.
Furthermore, of those presidents who have run for re-election, newspaper endorsements fall further for Democrats.
Historically, local city and county, regional legislative and all statewide races have had endorsements by newspapers such as Nebraska's Kearny Hub.
They show the least credible endorsements were for Al Gore from The New York Times and for George W.
These endorsements exclude and/or limit certain exposures that may fall within the coverage of the policy.
By attachment of the Riot And Strike Endorsement with the Fire Insurance Policy, it is thereby agreed and declared, in-between Insurers and the Insureds, that Insurance under the same Policy shall extend to cover Loss or Damage consequent upon Riot And Strike to include the following, which, however, shall also be subject to Special Conditions contained in the Riot And Strike Endorsement: -