Bill of Enclosure

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Bill of Enclosure

An act of the British Parliament that joined two or more strips of land into a single property. Since the Middle Ages, English landowners could, by mutual consent, join their properties into an enclosure, which consolidated use of land and was thus beneficial for farming. Many large landowners around villages enclosed their lands, leaving small landowners with patches surrounded by large tracts. The large landowners could petition Parliament to force the small landowners to cede their land to the enclosure. Parliament did this by passing a bill of enclosure. Bills of enclosure were passed most commonly in the late 18th and early 19th centuries. See also: Eminent domain.
References in classic literature ?
He was moving out of the railed enclosure when Andrews called him by name.
Ball after ball flew over or fell short or kicked up the sand in the enclosure, but they had to fire so high that the shot fell dead and buried itself in the soft sand.
The roof of the enclosure was of solid glass about four or five inches in thickness, and beneath this were several hundred large eggs, perfectly round and snowy white.
Never had Flora, the fresh and smiling goddess of gardeners, been honored with a purer or more scrupulous worship than that which was paid to her in this little enclosure.
He could see the white figures of the girls in the green enclosure whirling about as they had whirled when he was among them.
There were five or six of these mansions on the quay, from the house of Lorraine, which shared with the Bernardins the grand enclosure adjoining the Tournelle, to the Hôtel de Nesle, whose principal tower ended Paris, and whose pointed roofs were in a position, during three months of the year, to encroach, with their black triangles, upon the scarlet disk of the setting sun.
Just then the voice of the Prince was heard calling upon them to hasten, and a moment later he returned to the enclosure, followed by a number of his people.
As Smith-Oldwick realized that he was alone and practically defenseless in an enclosure filled with great lions he was, in his weakened condition, almost in a state verging upon hysterical terror.
Jane had sunk to the floor in the middle of the enclosure.
Upon the opposite side of the hill and just beneath her was a tower and enclosure.
The enclosure at the far end of the palisade was for the Malay and lascar crew and there also were quarters for Bududreen and the Malay second mate.
will you not open the gates of the enclosure to all comers?