employment cost index


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Employment Cost Index

An index compiled by the Bureau for Labor Statistics estimating the cost of hiring and paying the American workforce. Analysts closely monitor the employment cost index: an unexpectedly large increase may result in downward pressure in the market. This is because a rise in the cost of paying employees reduces profits, which in turn reduces stock prices. It may also reduce bond prices because rises in the ECI are seen as a harbinger of inflation.

employment cost index

A closely watched economic report by the Bureau of Labor Statistics that indicates the total cost of employing a civilian worker. A larger-than-expected increase in the index is likely to place downward pressure on both bond and equity prices.
References in periodicals archive ?
classification and other details see Employment Cost Index, release
The Employment Cost Index (ECI), which measures the changes in employers' wage, salary, and benefit costs, closed out 2006 showing moderate growth.
The employment cost index, a closely watched gauge of inflation, rose 0.
The surprising strength in the employment cost index for wages and salaries in the first quarter raises the possibility that workers, willingness to surrender wage gains for job security may be lessening.
The Street will be treated to the employment cost index, the Chicago purchasing manager's index for October, and consumer confidence numbers for the month.
Labor Department releases the first-quarter employment cost index, 8:30 a.
Despite the general increase in labor utilization, workers' compensation gains, as measured by the Employment Cost Index, have been trending down in recent years because of dramatic declines in benefit gains.
gross domestic product data and the employment cost index, both for the first quarter of this year, brokers said.
Traders said the employment cost index might not deter the Fed from implementing another rate hike when its policy-writing Open Market Committee meets Nov.
The increase in total hourly compensation over the first three months of the year, as measured by the employment cost index (ECI), was in line with its recent moderate trend.
Elsewhere, the Labor Department reported that the employment cost index increased 0.
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