employer


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Employer

A person or company that hires one or more persons to perform work on a full-time or part-time basis. The employer directs where the employee performs work, what he/she does, and so forth. In general, an employer is responsible for paying a wage or salary to the employee in exchange for his/her time and/or production. An employer may be required to pay a portion of employees' taxes.

employer

an organization (firm, government, etc.) which engages EMPLOYEES to perform JOB tasks related to the types of goods and services produced by the organization. See CONTRACT OF EMPLOYMENT.

employer

a person or FIRM that hires (employs) LABOUR as a FACTOR INPUT in the production of a good or service. Compare EMPLOYEE.
References in periodicals archive ?
Employers are facing increasingly tough decisions in regard to genetic testing in the workplace.
The employer pays the RSC a fee for its services and reimburses it for costs associated with the purchase and sale of the employee's home.
Employers of all sizes are recognizing the importance of changing employees' sedentary lifestyles and making health promotion and wellness programs part of their benefit offerings.
An employer that offers a home purchase program should be aware of the tax outcomes for itself and its employees.
Given the significance of applying vicarious liability as the appropriate standard as opposed to negligence which would require a showing of knowledge on the part of the employer, it is important to understand which employees within the organization may subject their employer to this harsher standard and under what circumstances.
1, enacted last year as AB 1825, requires employers with 50 or more workers to provide a minimum of two hours of anti-harassment training and education to all supervisors by Jan.
Given the diversity among employers and the wide-ranging jobs into which graduates will be placed, this is no small task.
The smallest employers have been the first to shift costs, but survey results suggest that the larger ones are following suit.
Garamendi does not yet have an estimate on cost savings his plan would provide to California employers, but has a consultant studying that issue now.
With communication, for example, some employers use a form that merely lists communication as a skill to be evaluated, while others break communication down into oral, written, listening, nonverbal, and presentation.
The standard requires the employer to involve its employees in the development of the ergonomic program and the job hazard analysis that must be completed on the jobs held by employees who report MSD incidents and involve one of the action-trigger factors.

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