Stability

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Stability

The relative steadiness or safety of a security or fund compared to the market as a whole. For example, money market funds and other short-term investments offer more stability than funds that invest in growth stocks.

Stability

The state of a security maintaining a constant or near constant price. Short-term securities tend to be more stable than long-term securities, but this is not always the case.
References in periodicals archive ?
Hypothesis 4: Emotional stability will moderate the negative relationship between negative feedback and employee job performance, such that the strength of this relationship will be reduced when emotional stability increases.
Emotional Stability: The most commonly researched Big Five trait found to have significant associations with career decision-making difficulties, career indecision and career indecisiveness is Emotional Stability (e.
Individuals high on emotional stability tend to display positive moods that foster helping behavior (George, 1990, 1991; Isen and Levin, 1972).
Individuals affected by psychoactive substance have low reasoning and emotional stability along with high apprehension and vigilance level that are likely to make them vulnerable.
In this study, the emotional stability of persons at the workplace and its role in their social adjustment in their work environment have been focused.
The interaction between emotional stability and gender was significant (OR = 1.
Employees with high levels of emotional stability on the other hand are less likely to be anxious, insecure, depressed, fearful, and nervous (McCrae & Costa 1986).
Those in the "B" camp might also score low on emotional stability.
Even if their emotional stability remained constant over the period, the participants became less outgoing.
Sports related activities not only improves health but also provide emotional stability," he said.
Emotional stability was not a mediator, but general self-efficacy and perceptions of normative health behaviors together partially mediated the relationship between CMNI-46 and HBI-20, transmitting a protective buffering effect.