Galvanic Skin Response

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Related to electrodermal response: Psychogalvanic Reflex, galvanic skin responses

Galvanic Skin Response

A physical response in the skin due to some stimulus. For example, turning red when one is nervous is a galvanic skin response. Some marketers measure galvanic skin responses on test subjects of advertisements. Proponents believe this is an objective way to determine a test subject's response to an advertisement, though critics contend that this practice does not sufficiently account for outside stimuli that may affect measurements.
References in periodicals archive ?
If an anomalous effect is moderated by the degree of paranormal belief, participants with a stronger belief Were expected to show increased electrodermal response amplitudes, a stronger increase in heart rate, and a higher hit rate for targets compared with nontargets.
This study also brings up questions regarding the significance of an electrodermal response to low-level chemical substances.
Electrodermal responses are dependent on the sympathetic nervous system (Boucsein, 1992).
Earlier studies have shown that mental arithmetic procedures can increase activity in muscle tension, skin temperature, heart rate, electrodermal response, and systolic blood pressure (e.
However, an electrodermal response to complete stimulus omission is reported in 43-80 per cent of participants (Barry, 1984; Barry & O'Gorman, 1987; O'Gorman, 1989; O'Gorman & Lloyd, 1984; Siddle & Heron, 1976).
In this case, we expected a typical pattern of response differences: higher electrodermal response amplitudes, suppressed respiration, lower heart rate, and lower pulse activity for probes than for irrelevant objects.
No evidence of classical conditioning of electrodermal responses during anaesthesia.
Comparison Electrodermal Response 1 Pleasantness-arousal-- Rise time (t = -3.
5 To measure electrodermal response, the subject is fitted with small electrodes attached to a galvanometer, which monitors the electrical resistance of the skin while being exposed to test stimuli.
The objectives were (a) to see if an electrodermal DMILS response was similar to a sensory response and, if not, to see if there were any useful characteristics that could be used to identify the former and (b) to compare the electrodermal response seen in DMILS with that seen in reaction to a weak magnetic field, allowing exploration of potential mechanisms or physiological response systems that might produce the observed DMILS effects.
Since Beloff's initial review, additional promising results have emerged from a series of studies which examined the autonomic detection of staring using the electrodermal response (for reviews, see Braud, Sharer, & Andrews, 1993a; 1993b).
These changes in electrodermal responses cannot presumably be equated to learning.