ejectment


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Ejectment

In common law, a legal action to recover title to land one owns by right. Ejectment originated in the Middle Ages but is rarely employed today. See also: Eviction.

ejectment

A legal action to restore possession of property to the party entitled to it.
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Johnson case knew that the ejectment did not in fact occur and no one
It is permissible to file an action to quiet title, ejectment, and adverse possession and consolidate them with a partition action to establish the rightful owners of real property and then determine what should be done after title is determined.
147) The language also highlights sovereign immunity, especially considering Lee's holding that officers of the federal government may be sued for ejectment.
By holding these provisions invalid, it did not mean that the tenants are automatically subject to ejectment from their apartments.
If the arrears are still not paid, we have been instructed to commence ejectment proceedings.
Warren brought an action of ejectment against Smith, but Warren's lease expired before the case could be heard.
An owner of land, like Shakespeare, had to be completely familiar with entails, uses, and actions for ejectment.
23) The Irish economic historian George O'Brien called the Gregory clause "one of the most effective legislative aids to ejectment ever devised.
In civil trials, the defendant had the right to be represented through counsel, the right to a jury, except in equity cases, and, after imprisonment for debt was abolished, no greater penalties than a judgment for damages, costs, or some special remedy applied against him such as specific performance, rescission, injunction, waste, replevin, or ejectment from real property.
1980), the court, while deeming proper a declaratory order proceeding to determine the county's property interest in railroad right-of-way, refused to order ejectment of the railroad, even if the county were found to have title to the fee.
She also represents resident and commercial landlords in eviction and ejectment proceedings.
First, courts in the early part of the twentieth century compared the junior user's laches defense--that the plaintiff "slept on his rights" for too long and now cannot enforce them--to an adverse possession defense against an ejectment claim.