Earmark

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Earmark

1. To set aside money to use only for a certain, stated purpose. Earmarking is common in both personal savings and in corporate finance, as well as in government. For example, an individual may earmark reserves for his/her honeymoon and a company may do the same to pay off bonds when they mature. Likewise, a politician may earmark government funds for a project in his/her district. When politicians earmark funds, the word takes on a slightly negative connotation. See also: Pork barrel spending.

2. Money that has been earmarked.
References in periodicals archive ?
OPE is also hiring staff to increase its watch over grants, including earmarks, Simon said.
The bill, which has been reported out of the House Judiciary and Government Reform Committees, would require that earmarks in appropriations bills include the sponsor's name.
Earmarks are particularly offensive to small-government conservatives, but they don't play much of a role in sustaining the central dynamic of the Republican Congress : the outsized influence of corporate lobbyists on policy-making as manifested in the Abramoff, and, more openly, in the K Street Project.
Many of the earmarks contained in the annual CJS Appropriations Bill assist law enforcement agencies purchase equipment, including highly complex and expensive technology.
Several of the institutions receiving large appropriations in fiscal 1992 (see chart) also rank among the top 25 all-time recipients of earmarks.
Trick: The Department of Defense's incredibly wasteful Medium Extended Air Defense System (MEADS), which appeared dead, was reanimated by a $380 million earmark in the Senate Defense Appropriations Subcommittee.
Over the last few decades, earmarks have been a frequent target of negative comments by politicians and the public.
Texas is one of the biggest states, period," Levinthal says, "but also one of the biggest states in term of its military presence, with earmarks oftentimes benefiting defense contractors or defense installations.
Earmarks allow constituents, through their representatives, to influence the federal government making it responsive to the demands of local interests; they allow members of Congress to adapt 'one-size-fits-all' national programs to local conditions.
Henry Waxman is absolutely correct in rejecting earmarks and refusing to play Congress' business-as-usual game.
After Americans United and the other public interest groups successfully aligned against the Vitter earmark, additional media attention focused on the use of congressional earmarks for religious groups.
OSU faces the loss of up to $4 million if Congress follows through on its plan to halt special-purpose allocations known as earmarks for the rest of the year.