e-commerce

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Related to e-tailer: e-retailer

E-Commerce

Commerce conducted over the Internet. For example, an online publisher may sell a book to a customer, ship it to him/her, receive payment, and conduct the entire matter without ever meeting the customer. E-commerce became common in the 1990s with the popularization of the Internet. See also: dot-com bubble.

e-commerce

The buying and selling of goods and services over the Internet.

e-commerce

a method of buying and selling goods and services over the INTERNET. E-commerce is a form of DIRECT SELLING/ MARKETING which enables a supplier to sell direct to the final customer without the need for traditional ‘middlemen’ – wholesalers and store retailers. E-commerce provides sellers with a means of tapping into a mass market; it reduces BARRIERS TO ENTRY so that even small firms can offer their products alongside big name companies; and by eliminating the ‘middleman’ selling costs and prices can be lowered conferring COMPETITIVE ADVANTAGE. Apart from lower prices another attraction for customers is the convenience of being able to ‘shop’ from home rather than have to visit a retail outlet.

The volume and value of transactions conducted via computer and associated networks has grown rapidly from the late 1990s and it is predicted that a large proportion of economic transactions will in future be conducted through electronic commerce. See also E-BUSINESS, CUSTOMER RELATIONSHIP MANAGEMENT.

e-commerce

a method of buying and selling goods and services over the INTERNET. E-commerce is a form of DIRECT SELLING/MARKETING that enables a supplier to sell direct to the final customer without the need for traditional ‘middlemen’ -wholesalers and store retailers. E-commerce provides sellers with a means of tapping into a mass market; it reduces BARRIERS TO ENTRY, so that even small firms can offer their products alongside big-name companies; and by eliminating the ‘middleman’, selling costs and prices can be lowered, conferring COMPETITIVE ADVANTAGE. Apart from lower prices, another attraction for customers is the convenience of being able to ‘shop’ from home rather than having to visit a retail outlet.

The volume and value of transactions conducted via computer and associated networks has grown rapidly from the late 1990s, and it is predicted that a large proportion of economic transactions will in future be conducted through electronic commerce. See also E-BUSINESS.

References in periodicals archive ?
They studied the influences of stochastic demand and stochastic lead time on the e-tailer in B2C mode.
Drop shipping had been used by mail-order firms in the 1980s and became one of the primary ways for the e-tailer to fulfill demand on the internet; there was a survey that indicated that 30% of pure play e-tailer relied heavily on drop shipping in the e-fulfillment [24].
Lots of previous researches focus on the operational aspects of the e-tailer or the retailer, such as pricing, stocking decision, and inventory rationing.
Operational Process of the E-Tailer in Different Mathematical Models
Comparing with other e-tailer models on the internet, this paper focuses on the situations about the e-tailer who uses both in-house inventory and drop shipping to fulfill two different classes of fuzzy demand and the e-tailer wants to choose the optimal mathematical model to get more profit under multiperiod environment.
According to inventory rationing and hybrid channel strategies, the e-tailer uses in-house inventory to fulfill two classes of demand when stock in the inventory is sufficient.
The inventory system of the e-tailer used in this paper is a (R, Q) model, which consists of many units of time t and inventory position [p.
The operational process of the pure-play drop shipping e-tailer is as follows; first, two types of demand surf the internet and place orders to the e-tailer; second, the e-tailer gets the demand information from two types of demand and forwards it to the supplier; third, the supplier distributes the products to two types of demand based on the demand information obtained from the e-tailer.
And the supply chain model of the pure-play drop shipping e-tailer is illustrated in Figure 1, where information flows A and B contain the same demand information:
Predictably, a handful of service firms have begun contracting with e-tailers to simplify returns.
It doesn't physically handle returned products, but it uses its partnerships with FedEx, Airborne and virtual liquidators to help e-tailers route products.