DY

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DY

1. ISO 3166-1 alpha-2 code for Dahomey before it changed its name to Benin. This was the code used in international transactions to and from Dahomean bank accounts.

2. ISO 3166-2 geocode for Dahomey. This was used as an international standard for shipping to Dahomey.

In both cases, the code is obsolete.
References in periodicals archive ?
Forest Service to access a stockpile located on USRE-held mining claims, the Company plans on utilizing a non-exclusive license for mining materials from the Oak Ridge National Laboratory for extraction of Neodymium, Dysprosium and Praseodymium.
Working with the magnet company Intermetallics, materials scientist Satoshi Sugimoto of Tohoku University and colleagues recently developed fine-grained magnets that require 40 percent less dysprosium.
That applies particularly to the heavier rare earths dysprosium, terbium, and yttrium, whose ores are less common, Bauer says.
Adding the terbium or dysprosium gives it a higher coercivity, which allows the magnet to withstand higher temperatures before losing magnetism.
95% dysprosium oxide produced in July (See July 12th press release for details).
Buy a copy of "Global Dysprosium Oxide industry" research report at http://www.
Above and beyond energy, the US Department of Defense, in its Strategic and Critical Materials 2013 Report on Stockpile Requirements, listed dysprosium as a critical material for military applications, citing important defense uses as nuclear control rods, magnets, and ceramics for electronics.
The ionic properties of that element, as well as samarium, praseodymium and dysprosium, make for some of the strongest known magnets, including some that function at temperatures high enough to remain viable in harsher settings like automobile engines.
At the moment, electric vehicle motors generate force using magnets made from rare earth materials such as neodymium and dysprosium, which are mainly mined in China.
Dysprosium and neodymium, used in automotive and wind-power applications, soared more than threefold since May to $3,500 per kg and 62 per cent to $450 a kg respectively, according to Sojitz data.
Some deposits of heavy rare earths such as dysprosium, a component of magnets in hybrid car motors, contained twice as much as in the clays.
According to its local research carried out since summer 2009, the leftover products contain enough rare earth minerals for commercial use, including neodymium and dysprosium.