Dwarf

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Dwarf

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Bean and Kempton looked at the light spectrum signature from the large planet as it passed in front of the dwarf star, and the result led to two possible conclusions: steam bath or haze.
A planet originally ruled out as having the ability to sustain liquid water, because it was orbiting too near a red dwarf star, may still have the ability to have liquid water on its surface.
Statistically, this means that six percent of all red dwarf stars should have an Earth-like planet.
Red dwarf stars tend to persist for much longer than yellow stars like our sun, so it's possible that if there is life on these planets, they could have a much longer evolutionary history.
The planet, which closely orbits the dwarf star GJ 436, has a diameter about four times Earth's and appears to be a hot version of the ice giants Neptune and Uranus.
This is the first time that such low proportions of carbon have been measured in the atmospheres of white dwarf stars polluted by debris.
Red dwarf stars account for 80 per cent of the 200 to 400 billion stars in our galaxy and scientists now believe that 40 per cent of those might have a planet in the habitable zone, the Daily Mail reported.
A University of Oklahoma assistant professor and colleagues identified these 11-12-billion-year-old white dwarf stars only 100 light years away from Earth.
Our new observations with HARPS mean that about 40% of all red dwarf stars have a super-Earth orbiting in the habitable zone where liquid water can exist on the surface of the planet," said Xavier Bonfils (IPAG, Observatoire des Sciences de l'Univers de Grenoble, France), the leader of the team.
White dwarf stars are small but very dense stars, and red giants are stars that swell to massive proportions when they approach middle age.
Along with the whirling descent of small black holes, neutron stars, and white dwarf stars into supermassive black holes, "these sources are expected to be the 'bread and butter' of the LIGO/ VlRGO .
As part of a large survey of nearby brown dwarfs-objects that occupy the mass gap between dwarf stars and giant planets - scientists from the University of Toronto used an infrared camera on the 2.