Downturn

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Related to downturns: Market Downturns

Downturn

(1) A period of contraction or decline of economic activity, especially real GDP, but typically employment as well. (2) The transition of an economy from growth to contraction, also known as a peak of economic activity.

Downturn

A decline in a security or market, especially after a long bullish period. A downturn is considered an inevitable part of the business cycle. See also: Bear market.

downturn

A decline in security prices or economic activity following a period of rising or stable prices or activity. Even strong bull markets are subject to occasional downturns.
References in periodicals archive ?
What is ironic but very natural, are executives, in downturns act like human beings normally do.
This recession is likely to be comparable in length and depth with the previous three major post-war UK downturns.
The period was excluded, however, in order to keep the time periods consistent with the downturns in starts and new home sales.
A business that seeks to grow has to realize that access to credit could change significantly during any downturn.
In addition, the AMT is counterproductive: It exacts its heaviest toll during recessions and thus aggravates, rather than ameliorates, the harsh effects of a business downturn.
Marketing services spending has historically been more stable than the growth in advertising spending as it is easier for clients to 'shut-off' ad spending in a business downturn.
4 times (x), providing a strong cushion in the event of tax collection downturns.
recessions), which illustrates the fact that spending on CPG and healthcare is not insulated from economic downturns and further highlights the study's recommendation to incorporate total economy trends and forecasts into planning and forecasting for categories, brands and stores.
Factors that could materially affect these forward-looking statements include, but are not limited to, the cyclical nature of the telecommunications/wireless, data storage, semiconductor and research markets and downturns or shifts in these markets; lower than expected customer orders and cancelled customer orders; increased competition and new product offerings from competitors; failure of products to find acceptance with customers; fluctuations in interest and exchange rates (including changes in relevant foreign currency exchange rates between time of sale and time of payment); changes in trade policies and tariff regulations; general economic conditions; and unexpected expenses or year-end accounting adjustments or entries.
Consequently, we are doing all the things that good companies do in extreme downturns.
As Virginia and most of the country try to find their footing after one of the most severe economic downturns in decades, business, government, education, funding and non-profit leaders will gather at the Greater Richmond Convention Center, September 11-13, to hear from experts and exchange ideas on how to create durable regional economies that minimize the impact of economic downturns.
As a result, while politically difficult, capital program spending can be adjusted to ease the pressure of reduced sales tax collections and operating expense growth during economic downturns.