Downswing

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Downswing

(1) A downward turn in a security's price after a period of flat or rising prices (market top). (2) The period during which a security's price trends downwards.
References in periodicals archive ?
Note that Okun coefficients indicate a different type of asymmetry in Hungary, Latvia and Poland: job losses in downswing regimes are lower than job gains in upswing regimes in these countries.
The smoothed regime probabilities for the downswing regime are illustrated in Figures 2-10.
Again, the estimates of Okun coefficients are negative for all countries in the upswing and downswing regimes.
In general, job losses in downswing regimes exceed job gains in upswing regimes suggesting relatively poor job growth in recoveries and the results are robust across different specifications of Okun's law.
While the world economy as a whole underwent long wave downswing, many parts of Asia reversed their trend and underwent long wave upswing.
Did it follow the advanced capitalist economies through upswing and downswing, or did its pattern deviate?
These patterns of long wave upswing and downswing are not deterministic, but they do, nevertheless, seem to be fairly durable through historical time.
downswing in the 1950s, and a short-wave upswing in the 1960s.
Focusing on industry level patterns, we allow for the possibility of either effect to emerge; however, we expect that, across sectors, upswings will be characterized by a greater role for new products in sustaining growth, and during downswings new processes will play a dominant role leading to the restructuring of production and job losses.
Conversely, during downswings, the performance of high technology industries worsens dramatically.
In order to explore the relevance of cycles in the relationships between innovative strategies and employment dynamics, we have first tested the model on all our cases, both the upswings and downswings, with results reported in Table 3.
The previous results are all confirmed; the average firm size of industries emerges as a positive and significant factor in job creation during upswings and is not significant during downswings, showing that major job losses are found both in traditional industries dominated by small businesses and in industries characterized by larger firms.