downsize

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Downsize

To reduce the size of a company. A company downsizes when its operations are perceived to become inefficient and it wishes to concentrate on certain competencies in order to improve profitability and reduce expenses. Downsizing often reduces the number of jobs at the company. Because downsizing reduces expenses, it often increases the company's value and/or dividends for shareholders.

downsize

To reduce the size of a company, often by eliminating one or more divisions. Management may decide to downsize a firm in order to improve efficiency and to increase the returns to shareholders. Downsizing can cause a firm to grow smaller and more valuable at the same time.
References in periodicals archive ?
Analysis of the key factors driving growth in the global, regional and country level downsizing and other technologies markets from 2016-2026 -- Historic and forecast data for crude oil prices during the 1987-2025 period -- 15 detailed company profiles of leading OEMs and suppliers detailing the downsized and turbocharged engines/ products they manufacture -- An exclusive Interview with W Motors informing and underpinning the analysis
After controlling for industry, they found that Fortune 100 Companies that downsized did not differ financially from those that did not--one and two years before the layoffs were implemented.
Other laws--such as The Worker Adjustment and Retraining Notification Act of 1988--may require special notification to employees who are being downsized.
Downsized companies often mistakenly measure innovation and its associated risk by measuring inputs, including R&D budgets as well as the number of people employed to find and develop innovations.
Among the 87 percent of companies that experienced layoffs in 2001 and 2002, a total of 1,022 employees were downsized, representing an average of 8.
Downsized managers have had a relatively easier time getting rehired than other workers.
Thus, importing may become an even more important function than before the firm downsized.
Second, it hopes to advance the field of downsizing and upper echelons theory by investigating the effects of top management team changes on performance in downsized companies.
The reason we have downsized is that we've had several generations of top management failures.
There are even rumors that Section 8 will be downsized in the near future as the government cannot afford to keep paying out the enormous sums now required.
The stress that develops in a downsized environment is different from traditional job stress for several reasons: a downsized environment is often beyond the immediate control of management; stress affects a wider percentage of the workforce in the organization than it would under more traditional circumstances; and it is long lasting and may recur with increasing intensity as job cuts both within the survivor's company and at other companies occur.