escheat

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Escheat

Reversion of monies or securities to the state in which the securityholder was last known to reside, when no claim by the securityholder has been made after a certain period of time fixed by state law. This is known as the holding period or cut-off date.

Escheat

The acquisition of property by a state or government from the estate of a deceased person. An escheat occurs when the deceased person has no will, no relatives, and no survivors to whom the property would otherwise go. Because it is rare for a person to have no relatives at all, escheats are fairly unusual. The concept has its origins in feudalism, when the immediately superior feudal lord would inherit property that would otherwise be left without an owner. Different states have different laws governing escheats.

escheat

The right of the state to claim a deceased person's property when there are no individuals legally qualified to inherit it or to make a claim to it. This occurrence is fairly unusual even when the deceased leaves no will.

escheat

The reversion of property to the state because of the lack of anyone to inherit it.

References in periodicals archive ?
42 regression models were analyzed, corresponding to all possible combinations (15) between dissimilarities of second-order general values, all possible combinations (15) between dissimilarities of work-related values, and 12 combinations involving dissimilarities concerning both types of values that were statistically significant in previous models.
Rus and colleagues' approach only used similarity to decide paraphrasing, ignoring dissimilarities which could be important to the final decision.
In conjunction with multidimensional scaling, dendrograms also provide a visual representation of the pattern of similarities or dissimilarities among a set of objects.
For example, English is the first language in both cities, but the dissimilarities in American and the Queen's English often make it difficult for either to understand the other.
If you still can't figure it out, though, here's a list of further dissimilarities.
Daniel Felsenfeld has produced a praiseworthy study that explores many of the important parallels and dissimilarities between these two giants.
Recognizing the dissimilarities between the comparable properties and the subject property discussed by the witness, the court said that the trial judge was within his discretion to base his findings of the fair market value of the subject property on the appraiser's testimony.
Al Qerbi, however, acknowledged that "there are many dissimilarities between Yemen and its Gulf neighbors", but he said discussions over those aspects should be based on "transparency and trust.
After this initial introduction, Gaines begins the biographies of these two great men, recording their extreme dissimilarities and showing how these would culminate into Fredrick's difficult test, and Bach's equally difficult rejoinder.
Whatever the dissimilarities of Saratoga, Newport, and Coney Island, Sterngass argues, to "see and be seen defined life at mid-nineteenth-century resorts" (139).
Unlike the preceding five year period, the upswing in Canadian responses in 1996 exerts a near uniform impact across all provinces and territories, accounting for nearly half of the specific indices of dissimilarities.
In no case did the sample spectra test falsely similar to a model, but some false dissimilarities were detected.