disqualifying disposition

Disqualifying Disposition

A sale or other transaction in stock that one acquired to an employee stock option plan within two years of enrollment in the plan or one year of purchase. The profit on a disqualifying disposition is not considered capital gains and is taxed like ordinary income, which is usually at a higher rate.

disqualifying disposition

The sale, gift, or exchange of stock acquired through an employee stock purchase plan within two years of enrollment or one year of the purchase date. A disqualifying disposition results in ordinary income for tax purposes.
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CCA 201519031 explored the application of the disqualifying disposition rules in two scenarios: Scenario 1 involves a transaction that qualified as a Sec.
If, on the other hand, the employee sells the stock before the statutory holding period ends, the sale will be a disqualifying disposition, and the employee will recognize ordinary income, which is taxed at a higher rate.
However, if your short-term goal is to reduce single-stock concentration, a disqualifying disposition strategy may outweigh the tax benefits of holding the underlying stock.
If a disqualifying disposition of stock acquired by the exercise of an ISO occurs, the gain from the disposition is determined as follows:
Under the new law, gains resulting from the exercise of an incentive stock option or an employee stock purchase plan (ESPP) option, or a disqualifying disposition of such stock, will not be treated as employment tax wages.
But just 71 percent of companies granting ISOs track disqualifying disposition, meaning that many companies are losing potentially significant tax deductions.
The first the public heard of this distinction was in Private Letter Ruling 9243026 (June 24, 1992), in which the IRS concluded that FICA and FUTA taxes applied at the time of the ESPP option exercise to the difference between the fair market value of the stock and the exercise price and, further, that federal income tax withholding applied to the income on disqualifying disposition.
If an option otherwise qualifies as an ISO, but the optionee disposes of acquired shares prior to expiration of both statutory holding periods (two years after grant and one year after exercise), the optionee is taxed, at the time of the disqualifying disposition, as if the option were nonstatutory.
But the IRS also determined that the value of the taxpayer's exercisable MGC shares exceeded the $100,000 limit The taxpayer asserted that the $100,000 limitation is only applied to shares that were not subject to a subsequent disqualifying disposition.
422(c)(2) limits the compensation income the employee must include as a result of the disqualifying disposition, to the excess (if any) of the amount realized on the disposition over the stock's adjusted basis.
When a disqualifying disposition of an ISO occurs when an employee disposes of the stock within two years of the option grant date or within one year of the option exercise date--the company gets a tax deduction equal to the difference between the option's fair value and the exercise price on the date the disqualifying disposition took place.