Disposition

(redirected from disposal)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Legal, Acronyms, Idioms, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

Disposition

The sale of a security. See also: Close a position.
References in periodicals archive ?
When Advanced Disposal acquired the Veolia Environmental Solid Waste assets last fall, the management team said to get ready for growth and that's exactly what we are doing in the Midwest region" said Regional Vice President Jay Rooney in a statement.
First, after running it, pour a bit of dish soap inside and let the disposal run for a minute or so.
investigated community-based programmes for safe disposal of used needles in the USA, Canada and Australia; (8) these included using puncture-resistant containers such as hot-chocolate or coffee containers with a secure lid and discarding these in the household rubbish.
The availability of a property disposal mechanism ultimately depends on the classification of property.
Categories: Government Operations, Accountability, Best practices, Data integrity, Documentation, Federal property, Federal property management, Internal controls, Inventories, Land management, Land use, Municipal governments, Property and supply management, Property disposal, Real property, Records management, Reporting requirements, Standards, Strategic planning
David Sutherland-Yoest, Waste Services chairman and CEO, states, "These acquisitions geographically extend our Florida base, enhancing our disposal based strategy.
EPA does not mandate a sticker as a form of verification that the refrigerant has been removed prior to disposal of the appliance," the Web site notes.
But the cost of shipping waste by train 170 miles southeast of Los Angeles is more than triple -- about $100 per ton compared with the $30 per ton Glendale now spends on disposal, Zurn said.
The other new method of disposal technology is to produce fertilizer pellets directly from the waste by drying and pelletizing it.
When stored in large quantities, they pose a fire hazard and should be turned in for disposal.
The standard for disposal is flexible to allow entities to determine what measures are reasonable based on the sensitivity of the information, the costs and benefits of different disposal methods, and relevant changes in technology over time.
Harford notes that the 1976 Resource Conservation and Recovery Act, which addresses the proper disposal of hazardous material, categorizes such common computer materials as lead (in glass), mercury, cadmium and arsenic as hazardous materials.