Dispersion

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Dispersion

In statistics, the placement of data points along a chart relative to an average or mean line. Dispersion is important to finance as the data points of say, a stock, determine the mean, which in turn helps determines the stock's trend. Dispersion is also used to determine volatility: data points all over the chart indicate that a stock has wild fluctuation in price.
References in periodicals archive ?
Liquid flows through the dispersing chamber that builds up a high induction vacuum with rates up to 800 lbs.
According to the report, the dispersing agents market is fragmented and has an immense potential to attract various small and big level industry players.
Fluctuating costs of raw materials have affected both the quality and quantity of dispersing agents that are produced and the ones available.
ZetaSperse 3700 is designed for the particular challenges of dispersing DPP, azo and phthalocyanine pigment chemistries.
ZetaSperse 3400 has been developed for the particular challenges of dispersing quinacridone, perylene, and similar pigment chemistries.
Large number of beads results in very fine grinding and dispersing and is said to increase output by 30-50%.
These advances have both a dispersing and a concentrating effect.
The Labor-Pilot 2000/4 Benchtop Modular Dispersing System is a multifunctional unit for scaling up from laboratory to production size.
The Conti-TDS uses a process that offers many advantages compared with the conventional mixing and dispersing methods.
We were all dispersing as we were told and they rolled up on us with their horses and began hitting us with their batons,'' said Kelly Brand, 34, of Los Angeles who was at the protest with the American Indian movement.
Important properties include (a) the amount of clay; (b) its particle size, mineralogy, and surface charge characteristics; (c) exchangeable cations, electrolyte concentration, and pH; (d) the presence of dispersing agents such as organic anions, and cementing or aggregating agents such as organic matter, carbonates of Ca and Mg, and (hydr)oxides of Si, Fe, and Al; and (e) interactions between these factors (Dong et al.