diffusion

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diffusion

the process whereby INNOVATIONS are accepted and used by firms and consumers through imitation, licensing agreements or sale of products and patents.
References in periodicals archive ?
The recent publication of a lecture entitled "A revolutionary science: ethnography," that Levi-Strauss delivered in 1937 to a group of left-wing militants, unveils the hidden, self-critical overtone of his later remark on "the most ambitious reconstructions of the diffusionist school" (Levi-Strauss 2016).
Time and again Kopp stresses that German imagination created the spacial and diffusionist model of Europe in which Germans are in the center; they dispatch and emanate culture to the periphery.
For instance, development communication has been theorized by scholars such as Melkote, Steeves (2001), Srampickal (1994), and Rahman (1993, 1995) as one that consists of message-oriented diffusionist practice and participatory approaches.
In an article dealing with this issue, I showed that Croatian ethnology, in spite of its alleged national(istic) bias, or maybe because it feared being accused of it, managed to navigate relatively freely in the multinational Yugoslav workers' state by examining individual items of peasant cultures within a diffusionist paradigm, irrespective of their "ethnic bearers.
Casanova 11) What hap pens to our diffusionist and evolutionary schemes of cultural influence (and imposition) when we recognize the work of informal sectors in the formation and circulation (in, that is, the worlding) of the modern novel as the predominant form of literary expression in the world today?
World literature is, first and foremost, a spatial category, which can emerge in many ways, from the transatlantic diffusionist model deployed by Franco Moretti's cartographic methodologies to the construction of imagined territories, such as Casanova's "World Republic of Letters," where literature is ultimately a matter of center and periphery.
Como dice Robertson: "It is ironic that the merger of Darwinian theory and cognitive psychology should have gravitated to diffusionist models of culture, the cibernetically-imagined migration of cultural fragments from one brain to another, rather than the interpretations of individual cognitive development in its social contexts.
According to Perez-Tornero & Martinez-Cerda (2011: 41-42), the paradoxical effect of technological advance and the inadequate citizenship training prove how diffusionist, economic and biased approaches leave aside changes in cultural attitudes and in the development of critical skills, creativity and the personal autonomy of individuals.
Under Fraser we students published two studies, "African Art as Philosophy" accompanied by a photographic exhibition based on the Structuralist premise of Levy-Straus; and a Diffusionist oriented book titled "Early Chinese Art and the Pacific Basin.
For instance the attribution of global modernity to the West is replete with intellectual diffusionist hypothese that radiate outward from metropolis to colony, spirit to matter, and civilisation to barbarism.
On a more general level, there is the diffusionist approach of Vicent (1997) and Cruz and Vicent (2007) and the colonialist approach of Zilhao (1993, 1997, 2001) and Juan-Cabanilles and Marti (2002).
7) On the India-centred political dimensions of Greater India as a diffusionist theory of culture, and Indianization as a civilizing mission, see Bayly 2004:715-24.